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977.3345 
L22o 

LANARK CENTENNIAL ASSOC. - 
HISTORICAL BOOK. . . 
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OUR HERITAGE. . . j^\' lUi . 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/ourheritagecentuOOIana 



HUN01S HISTORTCAl SURVEY 



)ur Heritage 

*"A Century of Progress 

In Lanark" 




Lanark, Illinois Centennial 
1861 June 18-24 1961 

Lanark, Illinois 



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NATIONAL 

OF 
LANARK 



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R. G. Amling 

V. P. — Cashier 
Director 




John L. Morris 

President 



EXPERIENCE 






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Agnes Amling 

Ass't. Cashier 
Director 




Reynold Bloyer 

Director 




Paul Diffenderfer 

Director 



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We Appreciate Your Patronage And 
YOU ARE WELCOME TO OUR SERVICE 

Exchange State Bank 

Lanark, Illinois 



Member 
F.D.I.C. 



Deposits Insured 
To $10,000 



Member 
Federal Reserve 



1861-1961 




100 times around! 
A salute to Lanark 



BRENNAN CATTLE CO, 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 




NOW GET SMALL CAR SAVINGS AND EASE . . . PLUS THE ROOM, RIDE, GO AND PRIDE OF THE COSTLIEST CARS! 



Give up go for gas savings? Comfort for compact- 
ness? Pride for handling ease? No more! Buick's new 
112" wheelbase beauty gives them all to you — all 
in a new Clean Look of action that's all Buick. 

Thanks to the Special's new aluminum V-8 engine 
plus aluminum transmission*, you can move into 
an expressway from standstill to highway speed, 
safely and sprightly as in a full-sized car. Yet, you 
pocket big savings on gas (regular, at that), oil and 
tires, too. (Proof? The Buick Special swept the 
Mobilgas Economy Run Class "C" with a whop- 
ping 25.09 m.p.g. . . . topping all V-8 automatic 
transmission cars.) 

And, make no mistake— the Special's no "sometime" 
car. It gives you an all-day ride that's at home on the 



superhighway as well as at the supermarket. Reason? 
Its big new Comfort Zone with more total head, hip 
and leg room than the compacts . . . new Hide- Away 
drive shaft that flattens the floor . . . new easy-riding 
Control Arm suspension, the same kind as on full- 
size '61 Buicks . . . smooth fitting Body by Fisher. 

And best of all the Special can be yours for less 
than most models of the low-price field. See and 
drive '61 's special car soon. Buick Motor Division 
— General Motors Corporation. 

'Aluminum IJual-t'alh Turbine Drive — optional at rxlra i oxl. 

BUICK SPECIAL 

Exciting new proof . . when better automobiles are built Buick will build them 



Congratulations, Lanark 

on your 

llUlth JVmtfteraaru 



> 



from the 



GREEN 

GIANT 

COMPANY 



"WE KEEP THE HOME FIRES BURNING" 




FUEL OILS 



Dial HY 3-2160 



I. B. DILLON OIL CO. 



Jay Hoffman, Agent 



Lanark. Illinois 




We looked at them all . . . 

THE BIGGEST "2-IN-l" VALUE 
BY FAR IS THE 



i iff! 



aj?n 



FREEZER-p/ws- 
® REFRIGERATOR! 



7"o /DAOi^e // to yourself 

ask your Amana. dealer about the 

USER'S REPORT! 

Your refrigerator— any refrigerator— was never like this! 
In a space only 32 inches wide— no more than an ordinary 
refrigerator takes — you have a genuine Amana freezer 
and a full family-size refrigerator besides! All in one com- 
pact, beautifully styled cabinet that's a credit to any 
kitchen ! 

You enjoy real freezer living with the Amana combina- 
tion. It stores 290 pounds of frozen food. Even zero stor- 
age temperatures keep food fresher, safer, longer. And 
exclusive Amana-Matic Contact Freezing is up to 2 : /2 
times faster than ordinary freezing methods! 

The refrigerator features glide-out shelves, convenient 
gallon milk storage, controlled butter conditioner, vege- 
table crisper, scientifically designed meat keeper— even a 
tall bottle shelf. And both the freezer and refrigerator 
have complete illumination plus Amana's exclusive 
Stor-Mor Door for extra storage space. See the Amana 
Freezer-p/us-Refrigerator. It's your biggest "2-in-l" value! 



I 




Model FPR-95. Total ca- 
pacity, 13.9 cu. ft., with 
space for 182 pounds of 
frozen food. Ideal for 
apartment dwellers. Only 
32 inches wide, 5 ft. high. 



Model FPR-98. Total ca- 
pacity, 17 cu. ft., with 
space for 290 pounds of 
frozen food. Exclusive 
Amana-Matic freezing. 
Stor-Mor doors. Brings you 
true "freezer living." 



"You mean I can 

'Fast-Freeze' on 

every shelf?" 



YE?-Y0U CAN FREEZE MORE 
FOOD-FASTER-AND KEEP IT 
FRESHER, LONGER, WITH AN 

Ami 



DELUXE 
FREEZER 




Model D-1B. 17.5 cu. ft. Holds 613 lbs. 
of frozen food. 

come In today! 



• Exclusive Amana-Matic 
Freezing freezes foods up to 
2V2 times faster than other 
methods. Each shelf is a 
fast-freezing surface ... all 
food is on or below a prime 
freezing surface. Maintains 
constant even-zero temper- 
atures to keep food fresher, 
safer, longer. 

• New Deluxe Door has extra 
storage for a whole month 
of meals! 

• Glide-Out Freezer Basket 
will conveniently hold up to 
74 lbs. of bulky hard-to- 
store foods. 

• Five -Year Warranty on not 
only the freezer but even 
the food yow store in it! 



LOW DOWN PAYMENT! EASY TERMS! 



See these and other quality Amana products at 

1. Oregon Home Auto 

Oregon, III. 

2. Deluxe Shop 

Mt. Morris, III. 

3. Osterday Electric 

Stockton, III. 

4. Cahill Electric 

Dixon, III. 

5. Freeport Skelgas 

Freeport, III. 

6. Merchant TV & Appliance 

Lanark, III. 



We, the present owners of Lanark Dry 
Goods, wish to dedicate this space to Mrs. 
Mabel Hoy who has given thirty-five years of 
faithful service with three owners, Mr. E. C. 
Landt, Mr. Ted Werdin and Mr. and Mrs. 
Emerson Champion. 




Lanark Dry Goods 

Lanark, Illinois 






^^^^3r ^* ' 


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i /w"ot* Mr 









William Shearer, Fred Shearer, Betty Rahn, Dorothy Sorensen 



"Celebrating our FIRST ten years in business . . . 
rinnrl n\l ^ k ana ' *^ e LAST ten years in Lanarks first century 

Lanark, Illinois 




Submergible 
PUMPS 





STC-RiTe 

ibmersible 
PUMP 



ROOTER SERVICE 

Have New Rooter 
For Sewer Troubles 

Call Day or Night 

Steve's Plumbing 

HY 3-6390 

Lanark 



Compliments 
of 

Freeport 
Journal-Standard 



Compliments of 

ELBURN PACKING CO. OF ILLINOIS 

In past years we have enjoyed very pleasant business 
relations with the cattle feeders of the Lanark community. 
To those of you who have made that possible we extend our 
very best wishes and hope that the future will bring continued 
success and prosperity. 

ELBURN PACKING CO. 

ELBURN, ILLINOIS PHONE EM 5-2651 



CONGRATULATIONS 
LANARK 

Weyerhaeuser Company 



SHIPPING CONTAINER DIVISION 



Central Region, 
Rockford Branch 



Since 1863 



THE LANARK GAZETTE 

The 2nd Oldest Business 
Has Been Serving The People of Lanark and Vicinity 



MRS. HENRY ENGELKING DICK AND GILPIN STAGG 

Editor Publishers 



Rockford District 

MUTUAL TORNADO INS. CO. 



— 65 Years of Service To Policyholders — 

SEE YOUR FARM MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE AGENT ABOUT A POLICY 

Jefferson at 4th St. Dial WO 5-9491 — WO 5-9492 

ROCKFORD. ILLINOIS 



10 



Our The 100th Birthday 

Congratulations Of Our Fine City 

MACS TAVERN 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 

Mac Jack 

Air Conditioned For Your Comfort 



ATTEND! The Junior Dairy Cattle judging contest which will be 
held at the Carroll County Fair at Milledgeville, Illinois 
on Saturday morning, August 12, at 9:00 a.m. (CDT). 

The contest is open to all 4-H Club and FFA members 
living in Carroll, Ogle, Whiteside and Lee Counties. 

The high scoring team of three members, plus three 
high individuals will be awarded an all expense trip 
to a major league baseball game during August, 
through the charity of 

Kraft Foods 

Milledgeville, Illinois 



11 



CHSSSEMAN TRUCKING 

"C." Keith Cheeseman 



Local and Long Distance Insured Livestock Hauling 



Lanark Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 

Serving the needs of Carroll County since 1874 

Office Phone 3-2519 

Truman H. Royer Lloyd E. Peters, Agent 

PRESIDENT LANARK - PHONE HY 3-2569 

Forrest Thompson Elmer Zugschwerdt, Agent 

SECRETARY CHADWICK -- PHONE MU 4-3631 



12 



B. & F. Gulf Service 

• Gulf Oil Products 

• Goodyear Tires 

• Exide Batteries 

• Complete Service For Your Car 



Norman Feltmeyer 
Glenn O. Blair, Jr. 



BLAIR MOTOR SALES 

201 EAST LOCUST — LANARK, ILLINOIS 

GLENN BLAIR 



Dodge Dart 

Lancer Cars 

Dodge Trucks 

State Testing Lane B 571 
Complete Overhauling 



13 



Happy 100th Birthday Lanark, 

from 

Gambles 

The Complete One Stop Friendly Store 



Giving you courteous, friendly and dependable service 

in such lines as: 




Sporting Goods 

Housewares 

Tools 

Auto Accessories 

Paint 

Plumbing 

Hardware 

Appliances 




~h *• 



JIM PETTINGER 



MARY EWING 



Shop around and you will find there are: 
Always Better Buys At Gambles 



HY 3-2537 



Lanark, III. 



BURGESS BATTERY COMPANY 

Congratulates 

LANARK 

on this 

Centennial JVnnfersarg 
BURGESS BATTERY COMPANY 

DIVISION OF SERVEL, INC. 

FREEPORT ILLINOIS 





14 



Congratulations 
On 100 Years of Progress 

HOLLEB and COMPANY 

Wholesale Grocers 

3225 South Western Ave. 
Chicago 8, III. 

Featuring: THREE QUALITY BRANDS 
Holleb's Supreme • SixOTIock • True American 

Available at your nearby Spot-Lite Food Mart 

CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE CITY OF LANARK 

For 100 Years of Growth, Development and Service 
from 

WELDERS SUPPLY COMPANY 

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 

JOBBERS OF WELDING MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT 



— Congratulations from — 

Chambers & Owen, Inc. 

FREEPORT and ROCKFORD 



15 



Compliments of 

Your Friendly 
Oil Man. 

A. V. "Ole" Olson 
Lanark 


"Live Better Electrically" 

Congratulations 
Lanark 

on your 

Centennial 

Commonwealth Edison 

Public Service Company 


Compliments of 
Stephenson-Carroll Publishers 

LENA, ILLINOIS 


LANARK, 

Our best wishes for a 
bright and prosperous 
future. 

Compliments, 
Northern Illinois Telephone Co. 



16 



CONGRATULATIONS 

LANARK 

ON YOUR 100th YEAR 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., INC. 

Freeport, Illinois 



FORSTER-APPELT 

MFG. CO. INC. 

5,000 Square Feet devoted to the Design, Development and Fabrication of Precision 
Metal Products through the employment of the following methods and machines: 



Boring 

Milling 

Turning 

Riveting 

Punching 

Drilling 

Turret Lathe 



LANARK 



Automatic Screw Machines 

Cylindrical Grinding 

Centerless Grinding 

Hand Screw Machine 

Internal Grinding 

Surface Grinding 

Hydraulic Press 

Manufacturers of: 

Model Aircraft Engines 

Hydraulic Governor Parts 

Gunsmiths & Shooters Equipment 



Honing 

Marking 

Reaming 

Tapping 

Assembly 

Broaching 

Die Casting 



ILLINOIS 



CONGRATULATIONS 

LANARK 

ON YOUR 100th YEAR 

a£ ?<%eefio>tf 



17 



Garner Welding Shop 

Quality Welding and Blacksmithing 

Portable Welder For Outside Work 

Phone HY 3-2151 Lanark, Illinois 

Compliments of 

McGRATH SAND and GRAVEL GO. 

PLANTS AT 

FORRESTON & POLO 



Plants also located at- 
Bloomington 
Chillicothe 
Executive Offices — Pekin 

Lincoln, Illinois Mackinaw 



CONGRATULATIONS 
LANARK 



FREEPORT BLACKTOP 
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 



18 



J. W* Burns Protective Agency 

WORLD WIDE 

Corresponding Bonded Attorneys, Professional Collectors and 
Skip Tracers Throughout the World. 

A Proven Collection System With All Payments Made Direct To You 
At A Maximum Cost of 10% 

Allen D. Budde, Regional District Representative 
Phone HY 3-6505 — Lanark, Illinois 

Harold E. Olson, Representative 
WO 5-3631 



^Ilagfr |L Peters 
INSURANCE 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 

FIRE — TORNADO — HAIL 

Res. Phone Office Phone 

HY 3-2569 HY 3-2519 



Jones Hardware 



Les E. Jones, Owner 



Hardware • Paint • Appliances 

Phone HY 3-2686 Lanark. Illinois 



19 



WE COMPLIMENT THE RESIDENTS OF LANARK 
ON THEIR 100th YEAR 

LEE HESS & SONS DISTRIBUTORS INC. 
608 Depot Ave. * Dixon, Illinois 

from the land of sky blue waters 

The Next 100 Years 
A Pledge For The Future 

First State Bank of Shannon 

Shannon. Illinois 



A Salute To Lanark's TOO Years 




Peter Pan Bread 



Congratulations Lanark 
on 1 00 Years 




famous since 1871 

WARDS MONEY- BACK GUARANTEE 

"Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back" 
has been Wards policy for 89 years. That means 
you're assured of quality, service and satisfaction 
when you shop at Wards. Always. No matter what 
you buy Wards guarantee complete satisfaction. 



WARDSl£ 

MONTGOMERY WARD ▼▼ 



20 



Congratulations Lanark 
on your 100th anniversary 




HYGENIC FABRICS, INC. 

Lanark, Illinois 

Manufacturers 

of 

Quality Fabrics 

for the cheese industry. 

"Lanark's Youngest Manufacturing Industry" 



Lanark Laundrette 

Coin Wash and Dry 

Dry Cleaners 
Hugh's Equipment 

— Open 24 Hours A Day — 



John & Evelyn Kloepping 
Lanark, Illinois 



CONGRATULATIONS 
LANARK 



BUILDING and CONSTRUCTION 
WORK OF ANY KIND 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Call 

JIM MYERS 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 



XSS&** 



21 



W. T. Rawleigh Co. 


Congratulations Lanark ! 


(72 YEARS OLD) 


^KMyfl3dBmWnla\u^ 


Congratulates 

Lanark 

on her 
100th birthday 


^H^^Bjl ^w Available From 
^^ ^^^ Your Local Dealer 

INDUSTRIAL COAL 

Contact Your Local 

United or Reiss Representative 


Mrs. Pearl Hartman 

SHANNON, ILLINOIS 


THE C. REISS COAL CO. 


The Rawleigh Dealer for 
Lanark and Vicinity 


Sheboygan, Wisconsin 

SINCE 1880 



Congratulations to the Lanark Centennial ! 

DR. WALTER NEHRKDRN, DVM 
107 Parker Court Lanark III. Phone HY 3-2592 



^^SESSKSSSSS^ 




PLR-3 Lo Boy model 



Hartman's Heating 

Air Conditioning 



ALL-AROUND HOME COMFORT 



Exclusive with ROUND 




A'K 



HY 3-6250 



22 



WALTER C. KNACK COMPANY 

WHOLESALE 

Cigars — Tobacco — Cigarettes — Confectionery — Novelties 

IMPORTER - JOBBER 

Complete Merchandise Vending Service 

Telephones: AT 4-1231 & AT 4-1241 
Dixon, Illinois 



We extend our best wishes for Lanark's Centennial 
Dejong and Associates 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

509 Empire Building 
Rockford, Illinois 



Poffenberger's Union Dairy 

Quality Foods and Dairy Products 

FOR A REAL TREAT TRY 

Union Dairy Farms Ice Cream 

Sam and Lucille Poffenberger 



FREEPDRT DYE WORKS 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

SERVING LANARK FOR OVER 40 YEARS 

£ Water Proofing £ Woolen Storage £ Free Minor Repairs 

Pick up and Delivery or bring Cleaning to 
City Barber Shop, Lanark — Tues. & Friday 




23 



CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 100th YEAR 

HOUSE ^ LINDBERG INC 

FINE FURNITURE 



201 WEST MAIN ST. 



FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



crcpntOA 



FLORENCE WEBER 



The Friendly Store 

LANARK 



GRACE CHEESEMAN 



BEULAH FLICKINGER 



BIB" FLICKINGER 



Congratulations Lanark 

For Friendly Service 

Your National Bank 

Mt. Carroll, Illinois 



Compliments of 




24 



Compliments of 

CARROLL SERVICE 
COMPANY 



Your 







Distributor 



Alden & Dauphin 

STANDARD SERVICE 

Headquarters in Savanna, Illinois 
White Marine Gas for Boats and Motors 

Main and Quincy St. 
Savanna • Illinois 



For 100 years of transportation 
trade with 

Carroll Co. 
Auto Sales 

Selling and Servicing 

* BUICK and PONTIAC * 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 




WHAT ARE YOU DOING 
WITH YOUR FUTURE? 

It*» in your hands today. Bend it — shape it — 
make it fit your foreseeable needs. And since so 
much can happen that isn't foreseeable, better 
have a margin for contingencies! 

The National Bank of 
Savanna 

SAVANNA, ILLINOIS 



25 



Dean's 
Dairy Products 

Delivered fresh daily 

to your food store 

by 

ESMOND & BURTON 

Box 258 
LENA, ILLINOIS 


VEITH MEMORIALS 

Successors To T. A. Wachtel & Son 

PIONEERS OF CEMETERY MEMORIALS 
SINCE 1898 

Mt. Carroll, Illinois 

THOMAS A. VEITH 

Res. Phone 4034 
Business Phone 4001 


Ernest Gump 

• Real Estate and Insurance Broker 

• Specializing in all types of Real Estate 

• Farm Loans and Appraisals 

- The Dealer in Dirt — 

Phone HY 3-2335 Lanark, Illinois 

SALESMAN SALESMAN 

Moodeg Gravenstein William Gillman 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

^.1 ^^ * ^l ^l ^ "^a. Amk 


TRADEMARK 

1 ICE CREAM 1 





26 



Complete Office Outfitters 

Sterling 
Business Machines 

501 Locut St. — Sterling, 111. 
Phone MA 5-4375 


• Insurance 

• Real Estate 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 


FREEPORT FRUIT & 
PRODUCE CO. 

Wholesale Fruits & Vegetables 

Frozen Food. Good Luck Margarine, Beverages 

PHONE AD 2-3185 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 


Compliments of 

Sieg Illinois Co* 

Freeport, Illinois 


COREY'S 

Philgas Service 

SAVANNA, ILLINOIS 


Shannon Tap 

MEL AND MARY FAIST 

AIR CONDITIONED 







United Roofing & Siding Co. 

P. O. Box No. 6 — Clinton, Iowa 



it No Down Payment 
* 60 Month 5% F.H.A. 
^ Expert Workmanship 



^ Hastings Aluminum 
^ Johns Manville Siding 
and Roofing 



27 



Foreword 



Through these pages you will find the history of our town, Lanark: its meager 
beginnings, its growth, its amusing incidents, its tragedies, and its people. We who 
have been involved in planning Lanark's first hundred-year celebration offer this 
with pride. 

If this has been a successful celebration it cannot be credited to any one per- 
son, but rather to all who worked in jobs large or small, and who are proud of the 
community in which they live or are associated. And among those associated with 
Lanark are the farmers whose ancestors were the backbone of the settlement of this 
area, and who today support the community as their town. 

The benefits of a venture like this cannot be measured in dollars and cents, 
but rather in the varied, far-reaching effects resulting from a community venture 
such as this. We have seen a splendid harmony of farmers and townspeople; we have 
seen new leadership develop; best of all we have seen people band together in a common 
effort, regardless of their personal feelings at the outset. 

In short, we have discovered one fact that is omnipotent in every community, 
whether village or city, which has been expressed by an unknown author: 

If you want to live in the kind of a town 

Like the kind of a town you like, 

You needn't slip your clothes in a grip 

And start a long, long, hike. 

For you'll only find what you left behind, 

For there's nothing that's really new; 

It's a knock at yourself when you knock your town 

For it isn't your town . . . .it's you! 

William Shearer 
General Chairman 



28 








Main Street in Lanark about 1914. 




m ie e e 




Main Street Lanark - 1961 



29 



Our Heritage 



When white settlers moved into northwestern Illinois the Sauk and Fox Indians 
were the only tribes to put up any real resistance. Relentless pressure of the white 
men soon drove the Indians across the Mississippi leaving the fertile prairies, the 
rugged bluffs and wooded slopes to the settlers. 

In 1830 Thomas Crane, the first area settler, took up a squatter's claim in what 
is now Cherry Grove Township. His home, surrounded by a 9-foot high palisade, was 
known as Crane's Fort. As far as can be ascertained, this fort was located at Lovers' 
Spring. One of the first surveyors' maps shows it located about one-half mile west of 
Highway 73 and one-half mile north of the township road, or the old Sucker Trail. 

About 1840 an inn or tavern called the Cherry Grove House was built on the 
Galena-Peoria road. It is presumed to be the inn operated by Ing Garner for his 
brother Francis, and stood west of the present Matt Garner farm, on Lloyd Wolf 's 
farm. 



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This was an early stage coach stop located west of Matt Garners on the Lloyd Wolf farm. 



Factually, Lanark is located in Rock Creek Township of Carroll County, Illi- 
nois, on beautiful high, rolling prairies. Its first settler was David Becker, followed 
closely by Z. B. Kinkade, John Kinkade and Nathaniel Sutton. Many thought settling 
on the prairie was hazardous and foolish, but soon the virgin soil was being broken 
by the teams and plows of E. Spaulding and L. F. Estabrook. While neighbors were 
cutting timber and grubbing roots, these men were enjoying a farm already made 
except for cabins and fences. 

William Renner, coming from Maryland in 1837 with his large family, hauled 
grain (mostly wheat) by oxen to Chicago and sold it for 40^ a bushel. He sold dressed 
pork for $1 per hundred weight. 



30 



John Wolf located in Lanark in 1842, farmed, invested in land, and loaned money. 
He was associated with the First National Bank and in 1878 opened what is now the Ex- 
change State Bank. Mr. Wolf owned a big Pennsylvania wagon and had a six-horse 
team (almost the only horses in northern Illinois). At the time of the famous Lincoln- 
Douglas debate in Freeport, he had hauled a load of grain to the city. He was asked to 
convey Lincoln from the Brewster House to the speaker's stand. This he did proudly, 
as he greatly admired Mr. Lincoln. 

James Howell first settled in Freedom Township in 1845, later lived in a house 
on the site of Lanark where his children, Thomas and Hannah, were the first white 
children born in Rock Creek Township. 

Daniel Belding who came from Vermont in 1855, made cheese, most of which was 
shipped to England. He was a school director and postmaster. 

Acting as an agent for the Northern Illinois Railroad Company, D. W. Dame in 
1857 purchased 80 acres of land , and John Nycum of Mt. Carroll donated 80 acres more 
to the railroad for the town site. The railroad company donated generous amounts of 
this land for the school, city park and churches. D. W. Dame laid out the city. 

The town's first name was Glasgow, but as there was already a town by that 
name in Illinois, the name became Lanark. Lanark is the name of the county in Scot- 
land where a banker lived who provided money for the railroad company. 

As soon as it was known that the railroad was coming, settlers moved in rapid- 
ly. Many dreamed of towns and cities being at every crossroad, and towns born on 
paper died when the railroad routed elsewhere! It is not possible to list all early 
settlers, but those brought to our attention were: William Crinklaw, Francis Garner, 
George Dorr, Peter Horner, Elliot Nichol, L. A. Chaffee, Sam Dietrich, J. R. Eby, 
Noah Flickinger, Joe and Ed Glotfelty, Jacob Grossman, Benjamin Noble, John Red- 
line, John Hess, Levi Bray. 





This is the oldest building in Lanark 



The Lanark House around 1900. 



The first house built in Lanark was a 16 ft. x 96 ft. structure intended for a 
boarding house for men working on the railroad and building the Lanark House (hotel). 
The boarding house was built under the direction of D. W. Dame, and when completed 
was operated by Daniel H. Stauffer and wife -the first family to live in the new town. 
Later C. E. Wales purchased the material in the boarding house and used it to build 



31 



the first store building which was used by him as a hardware store. S. R. Brenaman 
uses it now as a garage. 

The Lanark House (first hotel) was started in July 1861 to accommodate the 
workers on the railroad. It was built by John Wills of Texas (an uncle of Grace Wolf) 
and operated by Fred Gear many years. It is still in operation, known as the St. Jean 
Hotel, and owned by Mrs. J. St. Jean. 

The first business house was a small store owned by "Uncle" Chancy Grant and 
his one-armed son William. Their stock was worth about $150, but they made money 
and bought more property. Their original property was taken over by a Mr. Mishler 
for his grocery store. Another hardware store was built in 1861, a frame building 
owned by Blake and Stowell of Mt. Carroll. This was later purchased by John Hess, 
who with his son William, conducted the business for many years. In 1878 there were 
75 businesses. It was said Lanark did more business than any other town in the county. 




An early artist's conception of the Eby Building. 



32 



Some of the early business men were: Asa Bixby, Joseph Widmer, Wm. Crink- 
law and William Strang, blacksmiths; Mr. Cogswell and Seth Wiley, plasterers; 
Nicholas Fagan, harness maker; John Pailey, cashier First National Bank; Trescott, 
lumber dealer; Stauffer, Henry Reynolds, Benjamin Noble, grocers; Alvaro Shumway, 
John Allemong and H. S. Puterbaugh, druggists. Mr. Shumway and Mr. Cogswell also 
served as Justice of the Peace. M. J. Boyle, J. R. Sheller and John Risely, tailors; 
Israel and Lepnow, dry goods; Ransom Gilbert sold sewing machines and organs; Wm. 
Ross and L. C. Chaffee, wagon makers; Will Beans, men's clothing, boots and shoes; 
J. R. Bingaman, grain dealer; J. D. Wheat, carpenter; Garland, poultry dealer; Diehl 
and Roth and George Dorr, shoemakers; Dan Wiley, pumps and windmills; Ed. Sey- 
farth, jeweler; J. D. Wolfley, carpet weaver; and many others. 

Dr. Joseph Haller was the first physician followed by Doctors O. L. White, 
Porter Wales, Henry W. Wales, J. B. Porter, Pacificus Porter, G. Mershon, Eby, 
and Valentine. Dr. T. I. Packard and Dr. E. L. Hendricks served many years after 
the turn of the century. Dr. Blough was the first dentist; later there were Drs. Cham- 
berlin, Staley, and Woodside. 




The Lanark Gazette composing room looked like this in 1912. Type was set by hand at that time. 



The first newspaper was the LANARK BANNER founded in May 1863 by John 
R. Howlett. This publication changed hands a number of times, and in 1871 was dis- 
continued. The CARROLL COUNTY GAZETTE succeeded it. In 1878 Mr. Howlett re- 
turned to Lanark and published the paper for a year when Frank A. Livermore pur- 
chased it and changed the name to THE LANARK GAZETTE. In 1893 W. G. Wild be- 
came owner and publisher, and with William G. Redline as printer and pressman, 
guided THE GAZETTE through forty successful years. 

Early industries were varied, among them were the planing mill and sash fac- 
tory, woolen mill, grist mill, brick yards, cooper shop, marble works, creameries, 



33 





This mill was built in 1858 by J. T. Valentine. The millstone was 
shipped from Germany. 



The mill power was derived from this mill pond. 



laundry, carpet weavers, boot and shoemakers, and factories for washing machines, 
butter tubs, corn plows, fine harnesses, fanning mills, vinegar, cigars, corn-cob pipes 
and cheese. A canning factory has been in operation for many years. 




Marble shop started in 1883 by T. H. Wachtel and Elmer Ehmer. 

The first mail was carried tri -weekly by Thomas Crane from Crane's Fort on 
the Galena trail to Freeport. At the Cherry Grove station John Pierce kept the stage 
horses and was the postmaster for three or four years. In 1853 Jacob Emmert obtain- 
ed a contract to carry daily mail from Savanna to Freeport. This remained in effect 
until the Racine and Mississippi Railroad was built. In the early 1900's Free Delivery 
routes were established by the government. The carriers traveled 25 -35 miles a day. 
Lanark had 5 routes at one time. Today it has three, a fine new building, and in 1960 
$29,000 in business was handled there. 



34 




The railroad station and switching tower. 

The railroad influenced Lanark's rapid development greatly. The first line of 
the now Milwaukee Road through Lanark was built in several stages: in 1857 the Ra- 
cine and Mississippi Railroad built from Beloit toDurand; in 1858 on to Davis; in 1859 
to Freeport. In 1861 the Northern Illinois Railroad Co. built from Freeport to Kittredge 
and then Lanark. (In 1862 this line was extended to Savanna.) The Northern Illinois Co. 
consolidated with the Western Union Railroad Co. in 1866. (In 1901 it was sold to the 
Milwaukee Road.) By 1876 progressive citizens were anxious for a more direct line 
to Chicago than via Freeport. A railroad reached west to Byron from Chicago, and D. 
W. Dame, George Sherwood, and I. Dean worked tirelessly to secure a line from Byron 
to Lanark, to no avail. However, in 1880 the C.M.St.Paul came through Kittredge, and 
by combining with the line from Freeport to Lanark, a direct line to Chicago was ob- 
tained. As late as the twenties the depot was often filled with travelers who came to 
board trains. 

Lanark was a busy shipping point: in 1877, 379 cars of grain and livestock were 
shipped. 

Train wrecks were quite frequent - and many and unusual tales followed. At one 
wreck east of town during a storm the engine and several cars left the track. The 
engine reportedly disappeared in the quagmire and was never recovered. Another time 
a wreck west of town delayed other trains. Some passengers walked into town and 
visited with townspeople. One resident found himself talking with Chief Sitting Bull 
who had been to Washington, D. C. to sign a government pact. Once after a severe 
snow storm the first plow came through. Many people were on the high board fences 
watching. The high plumes of snow thrown by the plow buried some onlookers that 
were then dug out by friends ! 

Lanark's first library was started by several young folks, each bringing two 
books and exchanging them with one another. The WCTU then started a library over 
the post office until a fire made it necessary to move to the White Building. About 1930 
the White sisters moved the books into their home, and after their death, the library 
was taken over by the Lanark Woman's Club. 

The water works were built in 1888; the electric light system began about 1895; 
the telephone system was organized by local citizens in 1902. At first electricity was 
used only for street lights. From 1904 -17 Aaron Warfel operated the light plant, and 



35 



power was supplied only from dusk to midnight. The United Utility Co. purchased the 
Warfel plant. 

The old buildings and dwellings carry many and varied histories, and we have 
little but "word of mouth" history. Two landmarks still standing are homes built in 
1868 by bankers, Mr. Sprogle and Mr. Van Vechten, said to be trying to out-do each 
other. The Sprogle home on East Locust is now occupied by Jesse Shidler; the Van 
Vechten home on East Pearl is the home of Mrs. Carrie Erisman and her son John. 



'': -I.;-.':-"?-- 



■ '*"''■ 



;--'v. * 




L. Sprogle built this home now owned by Jess Shidler. Its present appearance is much the same. 



A Mr. Timothy O'Keefe built a four -family apartment on West Carroll. David 
Lower built a brick house on South Main in 1867, and it is now occupied by his grand- 
son, Donald Lower. The brick for this house, the J. F. Hess Hardware Store, and the 
Methodist Church were made where Mrs. George Beck's home stands in south Lanark. 

The Allemong building owned by Mrs. Ella Giddings was built in Cherry Grove 
Township and moved to Broad Street about 1864. Quite appropriately, a portion of it 
is being used for the Centennial Headquarters. 

The Glendora Hotel, built by Mr. Dorr, sold to Mr. Stauffer in 1914, has changed 
hands frequently and is now a private residence. 

The first church was built by Methodists in 1861, and was soon followed by 



36 




G. F. Van Vechten was the original owner of this house which still stands having undergone few changes. 
It is now owned by Carrie Erisman. 

several other denominations. A few congregations that are no longer active are: The 
Christian Church which began in Freedom Township in 1843, moved to Lanark in 
1862, and disbanded in 1956. Four men entered their ministry: Frank Sword, Frank 
Moffett, William Hawk and William Clemmer. The Congregational Society organized 
in 1859, disbanded in 1878. The Abrahamic Church was active from 1866 until the 
early 1900's. The Church of God functioned from 1866-1940. From 1867-1903 the 
First Baptist Church served the community. 

In 1862 a public school was started in the Pierce home, and that year Mrs. 
Figely started a private school in her home and hired an eastern girl, a Miss Williams, 
as teacher. In May 1863 a special school meeting was called to vote on the length of 
the school year and to decide about using the land given by the railroad. Much litiga- 
tion, many meetings and five years later a school was built on an entirely different 
location. The building and ground cost $15,000. In 1893 it was destroyed by fire. School 
met in the Abrahamic, Methodist and Baptist churches and in the north side school 
house. The north side school had had the first six grades, and was not used after 
1894 when a new school was built. In 1895 a four-year high school was begun. Charles 
Lowman and Nathan Grossman were graduated that year. 



37 



May 18, 1898 Carroll County experienced its worst storm. Some damage re- 
ported in a book by Cal Feezer of Mt. Carroll was: "The Lanark vinegar factory was 
unroofed; everything butthe house at Christ Rowland's is gone; Henry Arnold's house, 
barn, etc. gone; upper part of Charles Wentz's house demolished; at Cal Puterbaugh's 
all but house blown away; William Johnson farm a total loss, but he had $2900 tornado 
insurance; excessive damage in streets and in cemetery; all buildings at George Taber 
farm demolished; extensive damage at John Stineman and Nichols' farms; grain ruined 
and much livestock killed." 



Patriotic Organizations 

Lanark has furnished her full quota of service men in every war. It is especially 
fitting that we pay due honor to the members of Shiloh Post G.A.R. in this Civil War 
Centennial year, too. 

The Grand Army of the Republic was organized to preserve the strong fraternal 
bonds and to assist comrades in need or their widows and orphans. Lanark's Post 
was organized in 1880. It began with 26 members, and by 1913 had 88, all of whom 
had enlisted. They met at the Masonic Hall. The last old soldier was Amos Ditsworth. 

Charter members were: George Lattig, D. H. Snyder, George Noble, David 
Lepman, George Root, Willis Ray, Seth Wiley, W. Thomson, J. T. Valentine, M. J. 
Rowland, George Gordon, B. S. Gaff, Victor Whisler, Austin Willis, E. Stover, 
Peter Raymer, H. W. Wales, J. Ruthrauff, J.Garman, Jonas Buffington, Henry Foulds, 
Thomas Elder, Warren Sherwood, A. H. Bowen, I. L. Bowen, M. J. Boyle. 




Street scene at the 1912 Old Settlers Day celebration in Lanark. 



Old Settlers' Association 

In September 1874 a large number of old settlers met on the Carroll Co. Agri- 
cultural Fair Grounds in answer to a call in county papers. D. W. Dame stated the 
purpose of the meeting, Luther Bowen was elected president and Samuel Preston, the 
secretary. One vice-president from each township was elected and a committee chosen 



38 




Park scene at the 1908 Old Settlers Day. 

to draft a constitution which was adopted October 8. Twenty-five years of county resi- 
dency was required for membership. The Association aimed to bring citizens together 
for fellowship and to gather and record valuable historical information. It was to exist 
as long as any members lived. 

For 77 years the reunion was held yearly except during World War II and the 
1946 epidemic. It no longer exists as an association, but a reunion and celebration is 
sponsored by the Lanark business men and service organizations in the city park. 

Old Farms Still In Family 

The farm now known as the Kenneth Truman farm was purchased in 1830 by 
Henry B. Puterbaugh, and has been in the family four generations. 

In 1840 John Wolf came from Maryland by covered wagon and bought a farm 
north of Lanark. The purchase was signed by President James K. Polk. Still in use on 
the farm are the original red brick home with fireplaces in all rooms, a barn, and a 
spring. The present owner, a great-grandson, is Joy Wolf Sword of the fourth genera- 
tion. 

Francis Garner purchased a farm in Cherry Grove Township in 1844; now owned 
by Mr. and Mrs. Matt Garner. 

Jesse Van Buskirk purchased his 320 acre farm in 1841. It is now being operated 
by Mrs. Velma Van Buskirk and her son Clark. 

John Rowland and wife (Sara Puterbaugh) came by horse and buggy from Pennsyl- 
vaniainl847. From the government he boughta section of land in Cherry Grove Town- 
ship. The purchase was signed by President James K. Polk. Farm is now owned by 
Mrs. Sibyl Rowland and her son John Loren Rowland. The original home and barn are 
still on the farm. 

John Morris purchased 480 acres in 1854. The land is now owned by the George 
Morris estate; managed by Robert L. Morris. 

The H. B. Puterbaugh farm in Cherry Grove Township has been in the family 
since 1856 and is now owned by Eva Truman, Verva Robinson, Cora Corbett and June 
Lehman. 



39 




Wl ' TV * r ■> ft j ■ - ; !<,. 



The Puterbaugh family has owned this farm since 1856 when Henry B. Puterbaugh bought it from Francis 
Garner and Henry Puterbaugh. 




George Finifrock and his wife, Lillie, (pictured) lived here when this picture was taken about 1890. 

Elias Finifrock farm, now owned by Stanley Finifrock, was purchased in 1859 
and registered at Dixon, Illinois, Land Office and signed by President James K. Polk 
to Nathan Fisk. Severe northern Illinois weather caused the Fisks to sell the farm to 
Finifrock. Original home still in use. 



40 




The Martin farm, located between Lanark and Shannon, was purchased by Henry Martin in 1868 for $500. 
His son Harry purchased it in 1908. He lived his entire life here. Walter, grandson of Henry, purchased 
the farm in 1950. 



The Lowman-Courts farm was purchased in 1861 by D. J. Lowman and is now- 
owned by Mrs. Nelle Courts. 

In 1848 George W. Puterbaugh bought a farm in Cherry Grove Township, and it 
has been in the family more than three generations. Three Puterbaugh men who have 
owned the farm were all named George. Present owner and his daughter are living on 
the farm now. 

Henry Mellinger and wife (Sara Wolff) came by covered wagon from Pennsyl- 
vania in 1846 to Mt. Carroll. In 1868 he purchased a farm in Cherry Grove Township. 
A son-in-law, John R. Wolf, purchased it in 1877, and in 1918 he and his wife deeded 
it to their daughter, Miss Grace Wolf. 

The M. W. Copp farm was purchased in 1855 and has been in the family ever 
since. It is now owned by Catherine Cook Bornback and her sister Ruth Cook Barauski. 

We have reached the bend in the road of time and with feelings of admiration 
and respect for the pioneers and a certain nostalgia for those days that are gone, we 
look around at Lanark as it is today. 

The same quiet beauty that surrounded the early settlers remains in part. Some 
of the old houses still stand, and a few are owned by the original families. Many of the 
business houses are the same, some modernized and some replaced with new buildings. 

Schools have undergone the greatest change - a new high school and a grade 
school having been built in the last decade. 




This farm has been in the John Wolf family since 1840. Joy Wolf 
Sword is the fourth generation owner. 



41 




The Stitzel Brothers threshing ring about 1890. Picture is taken on the Bob Guenzler farm. Power was 
developed by the horses at the left. 



' >n*«%8fr*»^ \ 




An early picture of Lanark Cemetery and one showing how it appears today. 



Cemetery 



Our cemetery is still one of the loveliest there is. Since its founding in 1860 
the cemetery has grown to a beautifully landscaped area of over 37 acres. The Method- 
ists had a church and burial ground in the southeast corner of the present location in 
1860. The next year they moved their building into town, but kept the cemetery in their 
care until 1880 when they asked the city to take it over. The grounds were about full, 
and it was felt to be a city project. The city did so, and bought an additional tract of 
land. In 1881 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Kingery deeded additional land, and the Methodists 
deeded their land and plots to the city. 

Between 1880-1900 beautiful plantings of shade trees along the boundaries, 
arborvitae drives, and three large circles of pine trees and hard maple trees were 
made. Memorial services are held within the large circle of maple trees. 



42 



Recent History 



In the following pages we will try to set down in a brief way the progress that 
has been made. 

Lanark has always had a city government. The mayor is elected for four yeai^s 
and aldermen are elected for two years. There are three wards with two aldermen to 
each. Present city officials are George Peat, mayor; Ward 1 - Melvin Folk, Darius 
Krell; Ward 2 -Ralph Glenn, Keith Rogers, aldermen; Ward 3 -Perry Baxter, Emerson 
Champion; Robert L. Morris, city attorney; Leslie Fulrath, city marshal; treasurer, 
Mrs. Robert Merchant, Jr.; secretary Wm. Flickinger. 

Vast improvements have been made in the public utilities. In 1956 a new pumping 
plant with a 1300 foot well was built. It delivers 750 gallons per minute; water is 
chlorinated and flouridated. A sanitary sewer system was installed in 1938. The Public 
Service Company furnishes the electric power for the area. The Northern Illinois 
Telephone Company purchased the home-owned company in 1957 and installed a com- 
pletely new dial system which was put into service October 31, 1959. 

All the city streets were blacktopped in 1939-40. The main street is part of 
Illinois highway 72 and 73, and the southern boundary of the city is U. S. highway 52 
and Illinois highway 64. 

Businesses in 1961 include three medical doctors, one each of the following: 
dentist, veterinarian, attorney, drug store, mortician, frozen food locker, shoe repair 
shop, hatchery, hotel, motel, jewelry and furniture store, marine service sales 
company, accounting service, welding shop, a laundrette, dairy store, greenhouse, 
weekly newspaper, advertising newspaper; two banks, two hardware stores, two taverns, 
five grocery stores. There are insurance, real estate, farm service and supply com- 
panies, grain dealers, elevators, livestock dealers, radio and TV service and sales, 
lumber yards, fuel dealers, service stations, garages, motor sales companies, plumb- 
ing and heating companies, livestock trucking companies, and produce dealers, beauty 
parlors, barber shops, dry goods stores, restaurants and tradesmen of many sorts. 

Our industries include Forster-Appelt Co., manufacturers of midget airplane 
motors and precision instruments; Buss Bait and Buss Manufacturing Company, makers 
of fish baits and bedding; Hygenics Fabricating Co., manufacturers of sterile cloth for 
cheese making; Rogers Ready-Mix Co., makers of cement blocks and concrete; and our 
largest industry - Green Giant Canning Co. In 1948 Green Giant purchased the 
Fuhremann Canning Co. and has done much modernizing. About 3/4 million cases 
of peas and corn per year are processed. 

The Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad services the community. The 
Union Pacific road uses the same tracks for several of its "crack" west coast trains. 

On the next few pages we will tell you about our fire department, churches, 
patriotic organizations, service clubs, fraternal orders, youth clubs, etc. bringing our 
historical book to its conclusion. Because of space limitations, there has been much 
condensing and elimination of detail, but the result is a clear, broad panorama of our 
background years. 

This book was not meant to be a literary gem, but we have tried to present a 
factual history, receiving our information from every available source. 

We wish to thank all who helped compile the information and who gave pictures. 

As we face the second hundred years we must accept the responsibility that 
comes with progress, and from these pioneers receive the inspiration and courage to 
work together for the realization of our ideals. 

Mrs. C. F. Isenberger, Chairman 



43 



Churches 



The churches are in the same locations, some have been completely rebuilt, 
others remodeled. Out of these churches have come some fine religious leaders, and 
the influence of the teaching is witnessed in the daily association with our neighbors 
and friends. 

Sft 





Lanark Church of the Brethren 



Lanark Methodist Church 



Church of the Brethren 



The territory of the church was formerly part of the Cherry Grove district. 
Due to the numbers of members and the difficulty in travel, a division of members 
was made in 1876 using the creek north of town as a dividing line. Those residing north 
would be in the Cherry Grove district; those south were in the Lanark district. 

The church grew rapidly and within a few years two additions were built. In 
1910 the present building was erected. Twelve pastors have served during these years: 
the Reverend Mr. Murray, I. D. Trout, I. R. Beery, J. M. Moore, Clyde Fourney, 
Forrest Eisenbise, I. D. Leatherman, H. F. Richards, Clifford Paul, Walter Bowman, 
Lorrel Eikenberry and John Thomas. 

The church carries on a full program including Sunday School, Foreign and Home 
Missions, Ladies' Aid, and children and youth fellowships. 

No musical instruments were used in the services until 1925 when a piano was 
purchased. Several years later an electric organ was added. 

A weekly paper "The Brethren at Work" was published in Lanark for several 
years. 



First Methodist Church 



The Methodist Church started in 1858 in Cherry Grove Township under Rev. J. 
Brown. First services were in Sherwood's school house and one other until 1860-61. 



44 



In 1860 the church purchased a lot on the southeast corner of what is now the 
cemetery. The building cost $1200 and was dedicated in 1861. But the establishment of 
Lanark and the coming of the railroad proved the building to be poorly located. So in 
1862 James Wheat was paid $90 to move the building to the corner of Locust and Ro- 
chester streets. Church membership was 45. 

The original land reverted to Mrs. John Nycum with whom arrangements were 
made to deed it to the Methodist trustees for a burial ground and they could sell burial 
lots enough to pay for the church lot in town and fence the cemetery. In 1881 the land 
was conveyed to Lanark for its cemetery. 

When as many as 180 were attending Sunday School in 1867 a larger building was 
planned. Lots on the north side of Locust, between Prince and High streets were pur- 
chased. The $20,000 church was dedicated in January 1871. Red bricks for the church 
were made locally. A used pipe organ was purchased in Chicago and installed in 1889 
for $589. 

In 1876 a severe storm blew the main spire down. In 1901 sparks from the 
elevator fire ignited the belfry. The east tower was also consumed, but firemen saved 
the main part of the church. When repairs were made a new 1700 pound bell was in- 
stalled. 

In 1912 extensive remodeling and redecorating took place: pebble dash on ex- 
terior, new steam boiler, lights, carpet, oak rail from the John Wolf farm, Flautt 
Communion memorial, outside double steps replaced by single tier. Cost $3300. 

In 1955 under the leadership of Rev. Irving Bruhn subscriptions of $2150 were 
raised to rebuild the organ. He encouraged the congregation to plan for remodeling 
to coincide with their centennial. Under Rev. Wm. Johnson extensive plans were made 
and in June 1958 a fund campaign launched with the membership pledging $56,000. 
Plans included new chancel furniture, pews, lights, carpeting, passenger elevator, 
lowering floor of sanctuary, new floors in church parlors, classrooms with folding 
doors, new outside steps and sidewalk, and a church office. During the remodeling, 
activities were held in the Masonic Temple and American Legion Hall. Membership is 
271. There have been 44 pastors. 




Cherry Grove Church of the Brethren 
(Christian Education Wing) 




First Brethren Church 



Cherry Grove Church of the Brethren 

The Cherry Grove congregation was voted into existence on New Year's Eve 
1859. In 1860 work was begun on the spacious meetinghouse which is still in use today. 



45 



A hundred years later in 1960 a Christian Education wing was added to furnish eleven 
new classrooms as well as restrooms and storage space. 

Many people living today cherish fond memories of the past connected with 
Cherry Grove. Some have heard their fathers or grandfathers tell of hauling supplies 
by wagon from Freeport and Savanna to build the original meetinghouse. Others remem- 
ber the traditional two day lovefeast and communion gatherings to which friends from 
other congregations would travel for many miles, some even coming by rail from the 
Chicago area. 

The first foreign missionary to be sent by the Church of the Brethren, Christ- 
ian Hope, went from Cherry Grove to Denmark in 1875. 

Contrary to the modern trend, Cherry Grove remains a rural church beautifully 
situated on a large plot of ground in the open country. A spacious ranch-style parson- 
age was built close by in 1958 to accommodate a full-time minister. 

A rich history lies back of this church which has given rise to two other congre- 
gations in the area, one in Lanark and one in Shannon, some eighty years ago. The re- 
cent building done here indicates a forward look and a strong faith in the continuing 
usefulness of Cherry Grove in doing the work of God's Kingdom. 



The First Brethren Church 

In 1884 a group of Brethren people called on Z. T. Livengood, pastor of Bethle- 
hem Church of Milledgeville, in organizing a church in Lanark. The Rev. Stephen Ba- 
shor, an outstanding evangelist, held a series of meetings in the local Baptist church, 
and out of these meetings grew The First Brethren Church. The membership that first 
year was 25. 

The small, dedicated group built a house of worship in 1895, having used the 
local Baptist and Congregational buildings. Z. T. Livengood was pastor and served 
for sixteen years, then later returned for another nine years. Other pastors were: 
J. W. Beer, W. D. Furry, H. Welty, J. H. Knepper, L. G. Smith, D. F. Eikenberry, 

B. T. Burnworth, Charles Beekly, Charles Mays, H. D. Fry, C. C. Grisso. G. T. Ronk, 

C. Zimmerman, E. D. Burnworth, W. C. Benchoff, Dr. L. McCarthney smith, J. D. 
Hamel, H. F. Berkshire, Merle Hawbecker and Raymond Aspinall. 

The original building is still used, but in 1919 the sanctuary was enlarged and 
an educational unit was added because the membership was over 200. Later improve- 
ments were: enlarging the basement, installing cathedral glass windows, remodeling 
the sanctuary, installing an electric organ, remodeling the kitchen, furnishing a nursery 
and equipping it with a sound-system. 

A few of the outstanding Sunday School teachers were E. E. Dubbel, Emma Lichty, 
Ella Lichty, Sadie Puterbaugh, Oscar Tallman and Florence Truman. Mrs. Harry 
Miller was honored in 1960 for fifty years of teaching. Some of the outstanding superin- 
tendents were Will Herrington, Cal Puterbaugh, Christ Rowland, Harry Hepfer, and Ben 
Puterbaugh. 



Lutheran Church 

The Lutheran Church had its humble beginning December 20, 1874 when twenty 
area members met in the Congregational Church to organize. Rev. J. Henderson, 
pastor of Maple Grove, and Rev. Bell of Polo were in charge. Charter members were 
David and Susan Lower, Conrad and Sabina Diehl, Carl and Joanna Schoen, George and 



46 



Margueret Dorr, Jeremiah Slick, Phillip and William Schadt, Sara Flautt, Mrs. Haller, 
Anna Speicher, Mary Rosenstinger, Samuel and Mrs. Hassinger, Sophia Willis, Jane 
Henderson, and Catherine McCoy. 

In the fall of 1876 the congregation erected its own building. The present par- 
sonage was built in 1878. In May 1879 the consolidation of Maple Grove and Lanark 
congregations was effected. The names of Lowman, Hammond, Cotta, Grossman and 
Nichol were added. 

Mrs. D. H. Schultz organized the first women's aid called the Mite Society, 
later known as the Ladies' Guild, and it was active until 1958. (In 1891 Mrs. Josiah 
Kuhn organized the Women's Home and Foreign Missionary Society.) Rev. and Mrs. 
Hersch organized all women into the Service League. In 1951 an Altar Guild was formed. 
To conform with the women's society of the United Lutheran Church of America the 
church women were re-organized in 1958. They have two units -one called the Marion 
Unit honoring Marion CroftonRasmussen who with her husband, Rev. Peter Rasmussen, 
are serving as missionaries in Japan. In 1890 a theological student, I. K. Reed, and 
Miss Stella White organized the Young Peoples' Society of Christian Endeavor. 

Rev. Kuhn encouraged the congregation to create a building fund, but it was not 
until ten years after he left that the enlarging was completed -in 1905. In 1917 the 
church was again enlarged. An electric organ was installed in 1947. 

January 10, 1929 a new constitution was adopted and the church incorporated 
with the name "Trinity Evangelical Lutheran of Lanark, Illinois." 

The influence of Rev. Koepf and teachers was a deciding factor with Robert 
Crofton when he decided to enter the ministry, and was ordained in 1953. 

Present baptized membership is 377; confirmed membership is 251. Ministers 
who served are: J. Henderson, D. H. Shultz, W. T. Bactel, J. A. Beidler, J. Kuhn, E. 
F. Ott, Max Herring, I. N. Thomas, M. Colver, G. Bollinger, J. F. Sponseller, C. M. 
Wachter, H. C. Summers, H. C. Haithcox, Paul Buelow, M. Lesher, W. E. Kaitschuck, 
L. Mueller, W. Koepf, T. B. Hersch, W. West. D. Melbye, and M. Engelhardt. 







English Lutheran Church 



*i:-V ■ - 




Faith Reformed Church 



Faith Reformed Church 



The Faith Reformed Church was purchased by the Classis of Illinois of the 
Reformed Church of America from the board of the former Christian Church of 
Lanark on November 11, 1956. It was organized on January 4, 1957 by 18 charter 
families. The elders and deacons who were ordained and installed into their offices 
of a Consistory on February 3 were: Louis Newendyke, Gerald Pessman, Henry Van 



47 



Zuiden, Lawrence Tegler, Clarence Boelkens, and Jacob Dykstra. Rev. Richard Bouw- 
kamp was ordained into the ministry and installed as the pastor on May 30, 1957. 
In December 1956 the Sunday School was organized for all ages. It accepted the 
responsibility of supporting a missionary, the Rev. Samuel Hoffman, who is in Chiapas, 
Mexico. The Junior and Senior Christian Endeavor groups meet weekly. The Ladies' 
Faith Guild and the Men's Brotherhood were organized in October 1957, meet monthly, 
and aim to study and support missions. A Junior Choir is very active. During the fall 
and winter months one night a week is family night. Children have catechism; adults 
have Bible study and a prayer meeting followed by choir practice and a teachers' meet- 
ing. 



United Church Women 



On January 17, 1926, about 60 women of the Lanark District Sunday School As- 
sociation met at the Christian Church to form the first Bible Class Federation of women 
and girls over 18. The Federation aimed to unite the women for the advancement of 
religious, civic and moral issues. Officers were: Mmes. A. D. Moore, Addie Zuck, 
and Ada Eckerle. Serving on the board were: Mmes. Eva Royer, Anna Teeter, May 
Sword, Ruth Stattler, Emma Snively, Beatrice Hawk and Miss Lydia Steckelberg. They 
sponsored a Mother - Daughter Banquet in May and held about 5 meetings a year. On 
March 4, 1927 World Day of Prayer for Missions was first observed. 

In 1942 they united with the National United Council of Church Women -a new 
organization formed by merging the Nation and Home Missions and the Foreign Mis- 
sions Conference. 

In 1954 May Fellowship Day was first observed. Now there are the annual Jan- 
uary business meeting, World Day of Prayer, May Fellowship Day and World Com- 
munity Day. 

Recent projects were sponsoring UNICEF, taking children swimming, renting 
educational films about alcohol and narcotics for school use, giving books and maga- 
zines to schools on same topics; taking cookies to migrants; inviting migrants into 
homes the first Sunday they were in Lanark; and taking holiday meals or birthday treats 
to elderly residents in St. Jean Hotel. 




Taber's Livery and Feed Stable 



48 



Sch 



OOIS 



Schools in Lanark have made great progress since the first one was established 
in the Pierce home. The first building erected in 1865 was destroyed by fire in 1893. In 
1894 another building was erected, and an annex added in 1911, and a gymnasium in 
1928. A new high school was started in 1950; a grade school in 1958. These house all 
12 grades. Rural schools provided for rural children in grades. In 1949 the community 
voted to form a unit district and bring all schools under one administration. All rural 
schools were closed and the seventh and eighth grades moved into a new addition to 
the high school. With the building of a grade school in 1958, all students were housed 
in new classrooms. Lanark can be proud of its facilities. 

There are now 685 students enrolled in the two schools - an increase of 161 in 
nine years. Students have a choice between a college preparatory, vocational, or general 
course of study. About forty percent of our students enter college. Our schools are fully 
accredited. 

The last 100 years have seen many progressive changes in our schools, and we 
anticipate many more. Much credit is due those who have supported the educational 
system. 




Lanark High School today. 



The present Lanark Grade School. 





49 



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Lanark Fire Department 



In 1861 the Lanark Fire Department was founded, and by 1865 or '66 it was known 
as The Boyle Hose Co. andmadeupof Engine, Hose, and Rescue Hook and Ladder com- 
panies. Martin J. Boyle was the first chief. Foremen were William Beans, C. W. Cham- 
berlain, Henry Mayer, G. D. Crinklaw, and John M. Cross. 

The 25th anniversary of the department was observed August 25 and 26, 1886. 
Ten other towns participated. In one event 10 of Lanark's firemen ran 300 yards with a 
hose cart, laid 25yardsof hose, and had water at the nozzle in less than a minute. They 
received $100. Lanark made a 300-yard run with their hook and ladder and had a man 
at the top of a 15 foot ladder in 48 seconds. At the State Meet in 1887 Lanark won first 
and received $250. 




The first pumper of the Lanark Fire Department. 

The first Firemen's Ball was held in 1879 in the old Opera House with lunch at 
the Lanark House. 

With proceeds from their winnings, contests, dances, etc. the firemen purchased 
"Old Neptune," a hand-operated truck, that took 15 -20 men on the handles. A suction 
hose was dropped into a cistern and water pumped through a regular 2-1/2 inch hose. 
By 1917 or '18 Old Neptune was used only for Fourth of July fun, but it still operated 
well. The Council sold it to the Fox Film Company to use in the movie "The Chicago 
Fire." 

In 1917 an ordinance was passed that no fire apparatus could travel over 15 
miles per hour in the city! This was after Harry Sites pulled a hose cart behind a Model 
T grocery truck and broke a wheel. 

In 1924 a Stoughton truck was purchased and housed in the station presently 
occupied by the Lamoreux Grocery. In 1928 the new City Hall was built on West Carroll 
Street and the fire station moved there. In 1929 a rural fire company was formed by 



50 



selling shares to farmers to buy a truck. In 1947 the city bought a truck to replace that. 
In 1948 shares were again sold for another truck. The department had difficulty collect- 
ing from non-members the fees which were $35 the first hour and $25 after that. So in 
1948 a Fire Protection District was formed which is supported by taxation. This district 
purchased the equipment from the city and rural communities - and housed it in a very 
fine new stone building. 

New rural water systems often mean smaller stock tanks and no cisterns, so 
water is hauled to farm fires. In 1954 a new 1300 gallon tanker was purchased. The 
Illinois Inspection Bureau agreed that if 3,000 gallons were hauled to rural fires there 
would be a 6% insurance reduction. So another tanker was purchased in 1957. 

In 1953 the need of an Emergency Unit was felt. Enough donations were received 
to buy a used ambulance and equipment. At present there is a First Aid Fund made up 
of donations from people served. 

A truck was needed that could travel in soft fields, so in 1959 a four-wheel-drive 
power wagon was purchased. The problems of rushing four and five pieces of equipment 
to fires, going for additional water, and perhaps needing neighboring companies, re- 
sulted in the decision in 1961 to buy a two-way radio. 

There are now 28 members. The only surviving members of the original old 
hose company are Wilbur Whitmer, Boyd Barber and Carl Klome. 




This blacksmith scene was typical of the early days of this century. 



Commercial Club 



The Lanark Commercial Club was organized November 29,1946 and the follow- 
ing officers were elected: Ted Werdin, William Frank, Mrs. Luella Brown and Jack 



51 



Buche. 

A number of firms have been contacted by the club about locating in Lanark. In 
1949 the Forster Brothers, John, Henry and Frank, and Lawrence Wiebers moved from 
Chicago and built their factory and two homes north of the cemetery. Forster Brothers 
manufactured miniature airplane motors and high-precision products. In July 1957 John 
and Leonard Appelt bought the factory and dwellings. The firm is now the Forster - 
Appelt Mfg. Co., Inc. 

Through the club the Hygenics Fabrics, Inc. came to 120 South Broad Street in 
May 1959. Henry Sorenson is plant manager. The cloth products manufactured there 
are used in cheese-making. 

In serving the community the club has purchased the blinker light at the junction 
of highways 72, 73, 64 and 52; installed a drinking fountain at Locust and Broad Streets; 
worked with the Lions Club in building the city park shelter house and restrooms; de- 
corated the streets at Christmas and given children their treats. 

Present officers are Claude Stauffer, Lester Jones, Roswell Packard and Hugh 
Pettinger. 



*t 




The canning factory in an early time. 



Lions Club 



The Lions Club was chartered in 1956 with 213 in attendance -nineteen of them 
visitors from other clubs. There are 42 charter members, and the following have 
served as president: C. E. Cheek, Henry Sorensen, Howard Cassens, Arthur Rostron, 
C. F. Isenberger. 

Major projects of this service club have been building two tennis courts, erect- 
ing new street signs, building a shelter house in the park with the assistance of the 
Commercial Club, supplying disposal containers for the downtown streets , co-sponsor- 
ing the Centennial Celebration. 

Objects of the Lions Clubs are: To create and foster a spirit of generous con- 
sideration among the peoples of the world through a study of the problems of interna- 
tional relationships from the standpoint of business and professional ethics. 

To promote the theory and practice of the principles of good government and 
good citizenship. 



52 



To take an active interest in the civic, commercial, social and moral welfare 
of the community. 

To unite the members in the bonds of friendship, good fellowship, and mutual 
understanding. 

To provide a forum for the full and free discussion of all matters of public in- 
terest, partisan politics and sectarian religion alone excepted. 

To encourage efficiency and promote high ethical standards in business and pro- 
fessions; provided that no club shall hold out as one of its objects financial benefits to 
its members. 




This was once a woolen mill where blankets were made. It had become a poultry house by the time this 
picture was taken. 

Woman's Club 

The Lanark Woman's Club was organized February 12, 1929 by eleven members: 
Mmes. Agnes Peebles, Grace Franck, Cora Livengood, Grace Engles, Fannie Moll, 
Verna Campbell, Etta Packard, Virginia Howell (first president), Hazel Mathias, 
Lottie Miller and Miss Winifred Miller. The object of the club was the mutual improve- 
ment of its members, and the promotion of good fellowship and helpfulness in intellec- 
tual and useful pursuits. Soon after organizing, the club joined the District and State 
Federations. The group met in homes, in the Legion Hall, again homes, in the Commun- 
ity Room, and at present meets in the Methodist Church parlors. 

Throughout the years the club has contributed to all federation projects, the 
Community Chest, etc. and students have been sent to music camps. For 27 years it 
has been actively concerned about a library. 

In 1930 eighteen books were purchased for a private library which was available 
to the city. Early in 1942 a 5,000 volume library in the White sisters' home was given 
Lanark. Requests about the care of the books led to the responsibility being given to 
the Woman's Club. A committee selected 2500 usable volumes. Members gave $1 
donations for the preparation of a room over the National Bank which gave free use 
of the room. The library officially opened in 1944, and for twelve years members took 
turns as librarians. Many projects were undertaken to earn money for this, and the 
Community Chest shared its gifts. 

In 1957 the Library Committee circulated a petition favoring a property tax 
levy of .10%. Much credit is due Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lowman for informing groups 



53 



about library laws, tax levies, etc. The city voted for the levy and elected a board. 
The library is now in the Sites Building on Locust Street. The accessible, attractive 
rooms, increased volumes, and association with the State Library is very much appre- 
ciated by Lanark citizens. 

Parent- Teacher Association 

Lanark PTA was organized February 14, 1921 and a constitution adopted. 
Dues were 10£ per member or more - at their discretion. The first meeting brought 90 
people, and all year the attendance was from 80 - 100 persons. Officers were Rev. 
B. T. Burnworth, president; Miss Elizabeth Sprecher, secretary-treasurer; Mrs. 
Elmer Zuck, high school vice-president; and Mrs. Harry Gossard, grade school vice- 
president. 

Money-making projects for school activities have always occupied a great deal 
of time. Many worth-while projects have been financed to help the schools and to pro- 
mote good relations between homes and schools: library books for grades, a piano, a 
camera, electric food mixers for cafeteria, donations toward the public address system 
in grade school, high school band uniforms, community Halloween parties, and sponsor- 
ship of Brownie Troops. 

1961 officers are Mrs. Clifford Sichta, Mrs. Charles Burkholder, Mrs. Joseph 
Rath and Mrs. Robert Queckboerner. 

Wa Tan Ye Club 

The Wa Tan Ye Club, abusiness women's service club, was organized September 
5, 1950. Charter members were Mmes. Myrtle Baum, Luella Brown, Lewis Cram, 
Henry Engelking, Marlin Gaul, Fred Good, S. Hodes, Mabel Hoy, Cora Lindsay, Henry 
Sorenson, Juliette St. Jean, Roy Rife, Albert Warfel and Harold Zenter, the Misses 
Lorraine and Mary Ewing, Joyce Guentner, Pearl and Esther Kniss, Delores Peat, 
Florence and Hazel Schultz. 

The initiatory service, held in the American Legion hall, was conducted by Mrs. 
Lucille Stransky of Savanna, national president, Genevieve Butler of Dubuque, Iowa, 
national vice-president, Marcella Sack of Mt. Carroll, and Mrs. Edith Bather of 
Clinton, Iowa. For some years meetings were held in the St. Jean Hotel and then in 
members' homes. 

The president is now Mrs. Herbert Evans, and the 1961 motto is "Service Fore- 
most." 

Wa Tan Ye signifies "Foremost," and the members have been serving their 
community well. In 1953 they bought street signs for Lanark, and over the years they 
have helped with the heart fund, cancer and Red Cross drives, and sponsored a Cub 
Scout troop. 

Freeport Memorial Hospital Auxiliary 

The Lanark Auxiliary of the Freeport Deaconess Hospital was organized Octob- 
er 22, 1951. Personnel from the hospital and Freeport Auxiliary helped organize for 
the purpose of promoting and advancing the welfare of the hospital and its patients. 
First officers were Mrs. Earl Robison, Mrs. MacHarper Seyfarth, Mrs. Earl Bear 
and Mrs. Harry Lowman. 

At first collections were taken at each meeting to help defray expenses, then 
it was voted to pay annual dues of $1. Additional money was raised by special projects. 



54 



Money was given for student nurse scholarships, Hi-Lo bed and mattress, commode on 
a cart, inhalator cart, and $150 for a light in the emergency room. 

At meetings members worked folding papers, wrapping sponges, folding flats, 
etc. for the hospital. 

In 1960 when the hospital changed its name to Freeport Memorial Hospital, the 
auxiliary changed its name. 



American Legion 



A Post of the American Legion was organized November 8, 1919 by World War 
I veterans. December 13 a charter was issued to this Charles Y. Crouse Post No. 357, 
named in honor of the first citizen to give his life. 

Elmer A. Lockwood was the first commander, and meetings were in rooms over 
the National Bank. Charter members were: John Crouse, Harry Engles, Zack Kinkade, 
John R. Snively, Frank Myers, Zernie Brenaman, J. D. Chisholm, E. A. Lockwood, 
Dr. E. L. Hendricks, L. J. Hartman, H. H. Horner, F. G. Trousdale, Dan Eckman, S. 
R. Brenaman, Harold Hogan, Clayton Bowman, Albert Michaels, J. F. Miller, Roswell 
Packard, Clyde Newcomer, James M. Garner, Lester Rahn, Glenn Heyer, Leslie Rog- 
ers, George Peat and Boyd Gams. 

In 1946 when World War H veterans began joining the Legion a new charter was 
issued, and the name became Crouse -Engles Post -to include the name of Allen Engles, 
the first World War II casualty. 

In 1947, with the help of Lanark citizens, the Legion purchased the Glotfelty 
building on Broad Street as a memorial to veterans of all wars. 

The Post has sponsored many civic projects: sent a boy each year to Boys' 
State, organized a Junior Baseball team, gave medals to outstanding eighth grade 
graduates, and sponsored Boy Scouts. Max Sisler is the present commander. 




The Old Stone Bridge, an early landmark near Lanark. 



American Legion Auxiliary 

The American Legion Auxiliary of Lanark originated from Charles Y. Crouse 
Post, No. 357, on April 22, 1922whena group of wives, mothers and sisters of members 
of the Post organized. 



55 



Mrs. T. I. Packard was the first president, and Mrs. Katharine Crouse, a chart- 
er member and mother of Charles Crouse, was the first and only "Gold Star" mother 
for many years. 

In 1946 the name of the Post was changed to Crouse - Engles Post in honor of 
Alan Engles, first casualty of World War II, and new charters were presented to the 
Post and the Auxiliary. 

Charter members were Mary and Edna Bender, Marianne Brenaman, Opal 
Chisholm, Grace Dahnke, Carrie Diff enderf er , Violet Dorland, Alice Eckman, Mabelle 
Eastabrook, Elsie Fulrath, Edith Hartman, Olive Hendricks, Hazel Hepfer, Annie 
Musselman, Etta Packard, Ruth Packard, Emma Snively, Emily Snively, Mary Snively, 
Josephine Taylor, Bernice Trousdale, Julia Wales and Elizabeth Wise. 

"Gold Star" Mothers are: Mmes. Katharine Crouse, Clifford Engles, Earl 
Rahn, Ben Rosenberry, Albert Warfel, Russell Zier and Norman Hoffman. 

The work of the Auxiliary is chiefly in Rehabilitation and Child Welfare. 
Veterans' hospitals and orphanages are filled with victims of wars - those blots on 
history. The national government supplies the creature comforts for the unfortunate 
people, but over the years, the Auxiliary units provide the many "little extras." 

Grace Sweitzer, the current president, served in that capacity four other times. 

Since 1943 the Auxiliary has sponsored a girl from the Junior Class of the 
high school for a week's citizenship training at Illini Girls' State. 

Shiloh Women's Relief Corps 

After the Civil War the Soldiers' Aid Societies that had given relief to soldiers 
and their families disbanded. Years later loyal women organized as the Women's Re- 
lief Corps to give aid and comfort to unfortunate comrades. 

The WRC is the oldest patriotic organization in the U.S. In 1893 eighteen 
charter members began this corps with their officers: Nancy Sprecher, Anna Lafferty, 
Lettie Dresbach, Elizabeth Keller, Anna Bailey, Ora Sprecher, Rose Glotfelty, Lizzie 
Haller, Anna Sprecher, and Matilda Ford. 

About 1900 Shiloh had the first and only magazine of any Corps. Other projects 
have been: soliciting for a resuscitator and blankets; putting a granite memorial mark- 
er on the high school grounds; marking all GAR graves; sponsoring essay scholarships 
to colleges (Russell Brooke went to Northwestern, Helen Wilkin to Carthage College); 
giving flags to schools, American Legion and Boy Scouts; giving an electric clock on 
Broad Street as a war memorial; sponsoring the first memorial services in 1927; 
doing Red Cross work; instigating the Rock Creek Comfort Station. Six lots in the 
Cemetery were endowed by Mrs. Fannie Hegeman for members of the Post and of the 
WRC. 



Rock Creek Grange 



The Grange, a fraternal family organization, first started here 89 years ago. 
Energetic farmers organized 12 others in this area. D. N. Foster, a state deputy 
from Whiteside County, organized Rock Creek Grange #53 in 1872 in the home of 
D. S. Belding. Master D. W. Dame was assisted by these officers: Charles Cogswell, 
W. J. Dimon, W. M. Belding, Leonard Cogswell, D. Belding, C. Hagerman, I. Hodge, 
Mrs. L. Dame, Mrs. Fanny Hagerman, Mrs. D. Belding, Mrs. Lucy Cogswell. Male 
dues were $3; female dues 50£. Regular meeting was fixed for the Friday evening on 
or before the full moon of each month in members' homes. In 1873 D. W. Dame was 
on the state transportation committee, and in 1874 he was chairman of the state Execu- 



56 





The Rock Creek Grange, community center. 



Charles Cotta, a native of Carroll County, built a steam powered 
car in Lanark in 1901. 



tive Committee, and Mrs. Dame was Ceres. July 4, 1873 over 5,000 Grangers cele- 
brated in Elkorn Grove at "Uncle Harry Smith's." Fifteen years of Grange agitation 
brought about important state and national legislation concerning interstate commerce, 
and township and county mutual insurance companies. 

The Grange was active only a few years. Then in 1940 National Deputy Clifford 
Rugg met with Reynold Bloyer to organize a new Grange. Meetings were held in the 
North Otter Creek School, and the name Rock Creek Grange #1908 was chosen. As 
membership grew, meetings were held in the C. C. Center beginning in 1942. A mem- 
bership drive netted 57 members and won the second place state banner. When the 
C.C.C. building was sold, the Grangers met in homes, the Masonic Temple a year, 
and Meek's Dining Room until 1952 when the Good School east of town was purchased. 
A kitchen was added, oil heat installed, etc. 

Maude Lang has been state Lady Assistant Steward for several years. James 
and Gladys Keeney were the 1956 Illinois Couple of the Year. 

The Grange offers its grounds for a public picnic area; use of the hall is free 
for special 4-H, etc. observances; needy are helped; polio drives sponsored; youths are 
sent to camp. t 

Present Master is Francis Prowant. 



C. C. Circle 

In 1920 when some rural neighbors met with Mrs. Frank Fritz, Mrs. Charlie 
Weed suggested that a meeting be called to organize farm women. Thirty met at the 
Maple Grove Church May 7 and organized the Crooked Creek Circle. It aimed to help 
fellow citizens to improve the community. Elected to office were Mmes. Charlie 
Diehl, Sylvia Puterbaugh, Lester Rahn and Charlie Weed. 

The first regular meeting was in June at the home of Mrs. David Courts. Their 
own band played, and the Farm Adviser, G. R. Bliss, spoke. 

When the Circle grew to over a hundred farm ladies the Maple Grove Church 
was purchased in 1926, and the building named the C. C. Community Center. 

Some activities have been: working with the Farmers' Institute and Farm 
Bureau, helping with the Carroll Co. pageant, assisting needy families, donating to 



57 



USO, and serving banquets to farm organizations. A bronze plaque in memory of sol- 
diers of World War II was placed on the south side of the National Bank. 

The membership decreased by 1950 so that it was decided to sell the building 
and meet in homes. Twenty charter members still belong, and Mrs. Addie Zuck is the 
eldest. At present the Circle is a social group directed by Mmes. Raymond Grove, 
Charlie Diehl, Earl Carbaugh, Myrtle Baum and Roy Rupp. 



Mothers' Club 



The Lanark Mothers' Club was started in October of 1929 by twenty women. Mrs. 
Glenn Wise called the women together in her home to organize a study group affiliated 
with the PARENTS' MAGAZINE study course, in order that a better parent -child re- 
lationship might be established. Although no longer a member, in 1950, Mrs. Wise 
entertained the charter and current members in her home at a lovely "coming of age" 
party. 

Charter members were: Mmes. Lew Bates, Jack Buche, Don Chisholm, Ralph 
Dyslin, George Garber, Leslie Hoak, George Jones, Harry Lowman, Leslie Merchant, 
O. B. Newcomer, Les Rahn, H. B. Rahn, Rex Rahn, Jessie Sigglekow, Emory Tallman, 
Albert Warfel, Ethel Weed, D. R. Weed, I. D. Leatherman and Glenn Wise. 

Present officers are: Mrs. James Jones, Mrs. Paul Johnson and Mrs. Matt 
Law. 



Masonic Lodge 



The first record of meetings of the Masonic Lodge was February 13, 1864. 
Officers were Charles Cogswell, D. W. Dame, William Bean, George Puterbaugh, 
John M. Crinklaw, W. F. Ward and Mr. Tyler. The charter of the Lanark Lodge 
#423 A.F.O.A.M. was granted October 4, 1865. Meetings were held over the bakery. 
In 1921 the members built a two-story, splendid brick building. 




The town dray about 1880 hauling broom corn for a broom maker, Mr. Schilling. 



58 



Beltista Chapter No. 515 



The order of Eastern Star was established in the U.S. in 1778. On July 20, 
1871 a charter was issued to Irma Chapter No. 76 at Lanark. Anna Harnish was Worthy 
Matron; W. H. Wales, Worthy Patron; and Hattie M. Smith, Associate Matron. Other 
charter members were Lizzie Wales, Winnie Snyder, Emma Van Velken, H. H. Noble, 
Amanda Hamilton, Mary Dingee, and R. S. Wickey. Masonic brothers on the document 
were G. F. Van Velken, Benjamin Noble, E. W. Dingee, I. L. Hamilton, James Compton, 
George A. Smith, Henry Wickey, H. W. Wales, M. B. Harnish, and D. H. Snyder. Little 
is known regarding the activity or dissolution of this chapter. 

In 1903 Clara M. Kremmer of Ola Chapter, Mt. Carroll, called on Masonic 
families about organizing a chapter. On May 28 a meeting was held, requirements met, 
and the organized chapter named Beltista which means "Best of its kind." 

June 12, 1903 the institution of the new chapter was held. Officers were: 
Grace Franck, E. D. Leland, Phoebe Yeager, Helen Middlekauff, Ora Sprecher, Ora 
Strickler, Jennie Staley, Harriet Noble, Lizzie Wales, Etta Packard, Mary R. Stuart, 
Mary K. Dors, Ella Swigert, Rose Redline, Agnes Woodside, Cora McLaughlin and 
E. D. Frank. 

The chapter met at the Masonic Temple above the bakery on Broad Street until 
April 6, 1922 when the new temple was dedicated. 

In 1930 Jennie Klome received her commission as a Grand Lecturer and has 
served ever since. A Past Matrons' Club was organized in 1950. In 1961 Ramah 
Chapter, Chadwick, merged with Beltista Chapter. 

Etta Packard, Rose Redline, and Cora McLaughJlin are the surviving charter 
members. Fifty-year members include May Wiley, Anna Hower, and Amy Morris. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Bird are Worthy Patron and Matron. 



Boy Scouts 



The Lanark Troup 61 of Boy Scouts was chartered in February 1926. Rev. Eckert, 
pastor of the Church of God, was the first Scout Master. In 1938 the American Legion 
became sponsors of the group and still are. 

Troup 61 has its own camp. Nearly all members attend Canyon Camp every year 
for a week. Several boys have attended the big Philmont Scout Camp at Cimmeron, 
New Mexico. The National Jamborees have also been attended by some of our boys. 
"Skipper" Hugh Davies and Kenneth Gossard went to the California Jamboree in 1953. 
Gary Downs attended the 1957 and 1960 Jamborees in Valley Forge and Colorado 
Springs. 

The highest award in Scouting is that of Eagle Scout. To receive this a Scout 
must earn twenty-one merit badges in as many subjects. In 1931 Harlan Downs was 
the first Carroll County Scout to ever receive this. Later Hadley Moore and Eldon Low- 
er became Eagle Scouts. 

Many are the good turns Troop 61 has done for Lanark. For twenty-two years 
the boys have placed the street flags. On Memorial Day they decorated the soldiers' 
graves. They distributed Civil Defense books of emergencies, and "Get Out the Vote" 
posters. 

George Wales helped with Scouting for 22 years, a Master for 18. James Jones 
is the present Scout Master. 



59 



4-H Clubs 



4-H Club work began in Lanark in 1928 as the Lanark Agricultural Club under 
the leadership of Donald Duncan. The name has changed several times, and at one 
time the club divided into the West End and East End clubs, but in 1950 combined 
to form the present Lanark Larkers. 

Other leaders have been Wesley Langdoc, Melvin Stengel, Maurice Guenzler, 
Kenneth Kniss, Howard Cassens, Russell Lamoreux, Merle Sturtevant and Kenneth 
Erbsen. 

An annual livestock show was held for several years at the Claude Cook farm 
south of Lanark, then moved to the old fair grounds at Mt. Carroll, back to Lanark, 
and then to Savanna's Old Mill Park. Entries have become so numerous at this annual 
4-H Round-up it has become a two and three-day affair, 
up it has become a two and three -day affair. 

Clubs began as livestock groups, but now almost any field is included. In 1937 
the first home economics club began here when Mrs. Melvin Stengel, Miss Ella Sue 
Beck and Miss Phyllis Buche led a sewing club. 

In 1942 the Tip-Toppers (cooking unit) began under Mrs. Henry Engelking's 
direction. Other leaders were Mmes. Delmar Lang, Orville Bowers, Robert Lichty, 
Dean Lower, Charles Burkholder, and at present Miss Falodene Winters. 

The Wonder Workers (sewing unit) began in 1947. Special mention goes to Mrs. 
Ralph Glenn for leading eleven years, and Mrs. Russell Rahn for six years. Others 
were Mmes. Paul Sweitzer, Stanley Finifrock, Lloyd Edler, Kenneth Blakesley, Ronald 
Hoover, Earl Kaufman, Harlan Rogers, Ward Frederick, Herbert Brantner, John Max- 
well, James Miller, Ralph Flickinger and Robert Queckboerner. From 1950-52 there 
was a junior division of this unit. Girls who sent garments or participated in the cloth- 
ing revue at state fair were Marilee Lotz, Carolyn Erbsen, Margaret Stitzel, Velma 
Amling, Patty Graham, Elaine Hawbecker, Sharon Flickinger, Donna Lee Adams, Joan 
Burkholder. 

The Rockettes Club was organized in March 1955 in order to have a rural group 
east of Lanark. They have studied ten different projects. Those who have gone to state 
fair are Lorena Grove, Paulette Sheridan, Patricia Sheridan, Connie Libberton and 
Dianne Flickinger. In 1960 the entire club went to the fair with their Share-the-Fun 
act. For two years the club was the county Club-of -the -Year. Since its beginning the 
leader has been Mrs. Orval Schoonhoven, with part-time assistance from Mrs. Oliver 
Vietmeyer and Mrs. Robert Enge Iking. 

The Brookville Ramblers, a livestock unit, has been led for seven years by 
Emmerson Iske and Clarence Van de Velde. Gary Flickinger has gone to state fair. 

Home Bureau 

In 1946 Home Bureau units were organized in the county. Lanark has four day- 
time units and one evening group. Home Bureau is an association of women interested 
in education for home-making. Any woman may belong. A Home Adviser meets every 
other month to give the major lesson; other lessons are given by women in the units. 



Girl Scouts 



Girl Scouts started in 1940 with Mrs. E. Walters as their first leader. In the 
early years Mrs. Emerson Champion and Mrs. Allen Zier were leaders, too. 



60 




D. W. Dame purchased the land, under auspices of the Northern 
Illinois Railroad, and laid out the city of Lanark. He was the first 
mayor of Lanark. 



Biographies 



D. W. DAME, born in Sandwich, New Hampshire in 1820, came to Carroll Co., 
Illinois in June 1857. He located in Section 29, Rock Creek Township, on a 500 acre 
farm. The Northern Illinois Railroad hired him to purchase the land and lay out the 
city of Lanark. He was its first mayor and instrumental in much progress in the area, 
served on the state legislature, and held many city, county and state offices. 

DR. H. W. WALES, born in Ogle County in 1840, came to Lanark in 1864 to 
practice medicine. He enlisted in the Union Army and was active for the duration, 
then returned here to practice for many years. Dr. Wales owned the first automobile 
in Lanark, and the day he brought it home school was dismissed so children could see 
the new "horseless carriage." 

MISS LILLIAM CLEMMER taught school fifty years in Lanark and three 
years in the area before coming here in 1886. Many of our citizens have a common 
school bond, in that they had her for a teacher of history and geography in their junior 
high years. Summers she often traveled and visited most of the United States and Alas- 
ka, and several European countries. She was active in civic and church organizations 
and especially enjoyed good music, plays and lectures. Eleven girls made their home 
with her while going to school. 

W. H. HESS was born in 1853 on a farm north of Mt. Carroll and moved to Lanark 
in 1860. His father operated one of the first hardware stores here, and he succeeded 
his father in the business. Later he worked for the First National Bank. Investment 
properties were his main interest, and many of Lanark's homes were built by him. 
He is survived by a daughter, Miss Leona Hess. 



Nonagenarians 



These senior citizens of Lanark could each write or tell a book about Lanark: 
Mmes. Mary Peters, Carrie Erisman, Adelaide Dambman, Addie Zuck, George Morris, 
Rose Hermann, Anna Manning, Harry Force, Maynie Peters, Len Zier, Jennie Sipe, and 
Messrs. John Zier, William Sites, and John Bowers. 



61 



Do You Remember? 



Petey Wales' piano accompaniments for silent movies and song-fests? And his Great 
Dane dogs? 

The city ordinances prohibiting throwing snow balls, and Sunday ball games? 

Chatauqua? 

Dr. Henry Wales' first car -a Cadillac? 

The Old Opera House? 

That David Becker planted the first orchard? 

The log cabin that stood near the Frank Zier farm from 1838 - 1958? (Frank and Ray- 
mond Zier, Jake and Everet Sturtevant and Mrs. Lloyd Rogers are descendants of Wm. 
Boardman, the builder of cabin.) 

Wooden sidewalks? Then black-topped ones? 

Wm. Hogan of the City Drug exhibiting a new phonograph, and playing songs and 
political speeches on request? 

McKenney Bros, and Lafferty Store advertising everything from a darning needle to 
a threshing machine in 1897. 

The old windmill at Broad and Carroll Streets that pumped water for the city until 
1889? 

That an airplane was built east of Lanark? 

That a Cotta car was built here in 1903? 

The high school band went to Flint, Michigan to the National Band contest May 21, 
1930. 

When the property owners on West Pearl Street paved the street at a cost of $2 per 
frontage foot per property owner? 

That a Dodge touring car cost $862 in 1939? 

That in 1939 Carroll County celebrated its centennial? 

When the firebell hung from two posts in front of George Wales' grocery? 

That the first time automobiles were in the Old Settlers' parade was in 1910? 
That at one time Lanark had 14 "secret societies?" 

When Lanark had a 35 -piece cornet band under the direction of D. C. Pfautz? 



62 



Lanark Farmers 


*?xiniK Sendee 




Elevator and Machinery- 


Harlan Carbaugh 


Department 


• Minneapolis-Moline • Kewanee 




• New Holland • Gehl 


MASSEY-FERGUSON IMPLEMENTS 




GRAIN — FEEDS — SEEDS — FERTILIZER 


Lanark, Illinois 




Serving 




Carroll 




County 


Carroll Co. 


Over 
50 Years 


Locker Service 


KRAFT'S 


Complete Processing 


MEN'S AND BOYS' WEAR 


From Farm to Freezer 






Phone 3111 


Phone HY 3-2370 Lanark, Illinois 






Mt. Carroll, Illinois 


— Congrai 


ulations — 


Adams I 


fc Martin 


DRY GOODS and 


READY TO WEAR 


Mt. Carre 


►II, Illinois 



63 



EUREKA SPRINGS POET'S WORK IS TAUGHT IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
True fame being the nebulous thing it is, few poets live to see their work taught 
in the public schools. A prime exception is Glenn Ward Dresbach of Eureka Springs, 
whose 71 years in the service of poetry has recently led to his election to the Inter- 
national Institute of Arts and Letters. 

A native of Lanark, Carroll County, Illinois, Dresbach moved to Carroll County, 
Arkansas, in 1941 following an illustrious twin career of business and poetry. He has 
published 11 volumes of poetry, climaxing with "Collected Poems, 1914-1948" (Cax- 
ton Printers, Ltd.) in 1950. 



The Last Corn Shock 



- Glenn Ward Dresbach - 

I remember how we stood 

In the field, while far away 
Blue hazes drifted on from hill to hill 
And curled like smoke from many a sunset wood, 
And the loaded wagon creaked while standing still . . 

I heard my father say, 

"The last corn shock can stay." 

We had seen a pheasant there 

In the sun; he went inside 
As if he claimed the shock, as if he meant 
To show us, with the field so nearly bare, 
We had no right to take his rustic tent. 

And so we circled wide 

For home, and let him hide. 

The first wild ducks flashed by 

Where the pasture brook could hold 
The sunset at the curve, and drifting floss 
Escaped the wind and clung. The shocks were dry 
And rustled on the wagon. Far across 

The field, against the cold, 

The last shock turned to gold. 



From THE COLLECTED POEMS, 1914- 
1948, of GLENN WARD DRESBACH 

(The Caxton Printers, Ltd., Caldwell, 

Idaho) 



64 




BOARD OF DIRECTORS & DIVISION CHAIRMEN 
SEATED- Warren Barklow, Director; Maude Lang, Chairman Spectacle Ticket Division; Harriet Liston, 
Chairman Participation Division; Joyce McKean, Co-chairman Spectacle Ticket Division; Ralph Garner, 
Director & Chairman Hospitality Division; Dr. C. F.Isenberger, Chairman Publicity Division. STANDING - 
Cliff Sichta, Chairman Spectacle Division; Howard Nelson, Director; Harlan Carbaugh, Director & Chairman 
Participation Division; Emerson Champion, Chairman Revenue Division; Naaman Diehl, President; John 
Shippee, Director; Frank Sisler, Vice-president; Claude Stauffer, Director; William Shearer, General 
Chairman. NOT SHOWN - Dorothy Nelson, Secretary; Bill & Dick Flickinger, Treasurers; Earl Nailor, 
Chairman Special Events Division. 





DISTRIBUTIVE COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Joyce Blair, Lucille Champion, Ruth Geary. STANDING - 
Jerry Blair; Warren Barklow, Chairman; Dr. C. F. Isenberger, 
Division Chairman; Wales Geary. 



SCENARIO & TITLE COMMITTEE 
LEFT TO RIGHT -Mrs. Earl Derrer, Mrs. A. Y. Thomson, Mrs. 
Nelle Courts, Chairman. 



65 



HART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 

sol Levy 

— Freeport's Finest Men's Store — 

ARROW SHIRTS DOBBS HATS 


*i¥Atel ?neeftont 

FIREPROOF 

"Air Conditioned, Facilities For All Occasions" 

• Marine Dining Room 

• Bronze Steer Lounge 

• Garden Room 

• Cruise Room 

Treat Your Family To A Fine Sunday Dinner 
DIAL AD 2-3161 FREEPORT, ILL. 


Lanark TV Center 

Our 27th Year of Electronic 
Leadership With Service 

"HAPPY BIRTHDAY LANARK" 

H. L. DOWNS 

HY 3-2581 Lanark, III. 


GREETINGS ON LANARK'S 100th YEAR 

Your Friendly Oil Man 

Fred Nesemeier 

SHANNON % ILLINOIS 


Lanark — Congratulations 

• Back Hole Digging 

• Ditch Digging 

Wilson Linton 

LANARK ILLINOIS 


— CONGRATULATIONS LANARK — 

B. L Distributors 

Dick and Bess Roche 

Music Boxes 


To Lanark — "A Happy Birthday" 

Crawford Drug Store 

Prescription Specialists 

111 W. Stephenson St. — Freeport, Illinois 

J. A. Crawford, R.Ph. Geo. J. Henkel, R.Ph. 


"A Salute To Lanark" 

Milledgeville Greenhouses 

"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
Phone: CA 5-4661 - Milledgeville, III. 


Hartman's Cafe - Mt. Carroll, III. 


"Your F.S.T. Man" 

PRESTON KRIEDER 

Milledgeville Illinois 



66 




f * . 






in ^ < 



DECORATION COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Caralee Aschenbrenner, Mrs. Marian Peat. 

INDUSTRIAL COMMITTEE 
STANDING -Roswell Packard, Chairman; Harlan Carbaugh; Robert 
Schoen; Hugh Pettinger. 



AUDIENCE AREA COMMITTEE 
SEATED - Francis Kloepping, James Myers, Elmer Kaufman, Chair- 
man. STANDING -Wayne Derrer, Ray Lower. 





CELEBRATION BELLES COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Velma Gillogly; Mrs. Erna Garner, Chairman; Mrs. 
Betty Wiebers. STANDING - Mrs. Helen Rahn, Mrs. Alma Rahn, Mrs. 
Lucille Hammond. NOT SHOWN -Rita Tallman. 



HISTORICAL WINDOWS COMMITTEE 
SEATED - Mrs. John Henze, Mrs. Barbara Roth, Mrs. Ruth Geary, 
Mrs. Jeannine Carroll. STANDING -John Henze, Mrs. Martin Gaul, 
Mrs. Caralee Aschenbrenner, Sherman Brenaman, Henry Sorensen, 
Chairman. 



67 



Greetings Lanark 

"We're Good Mixers' 1 

FORRESTON - LANARK & POLO 
READY-MIX 

Call HY 3-2311 Lanark, Illinois 


Compliments of 

L. P. Thermogas 
Company 

HYacinth 3-2325 E Locust Street 

Lanark, Illinois 


Compliments of 
Merchants Chevrolet Sales 

Your 


COMPLIMENTS OF: 

Savanna, III. 


Dealer 
and Service Man 

Lanark, Illinois 


CONGRATULATIONS LANARK 

Satellite Motel 

on Route 64 

Individual Heat - Television - Air Conditioned 

MATT LAW 

Lanark, Illinois 


A GIFT FOR THE HOME 

WOODIN'S FURNITURE 

Milledgevile, Illinois 


Compliments of 

Sites Oil Company 

MARK SITES 

Lanark 


BARKLOW ELECTRIC 

— Everything Electric — 
Warren Barklow 

LANARK ILLINOIS 
HY 3-2254 



68 





CELEBRATION BALL COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Ruth Witt, Mrs. Ardlth Winters, Mrs. Marilyn 
Christiansen. STANDING- Max Sisler, James M. Miller, E. K. 
Graham, Chairman. 



DIGNITARIES & GUESTS COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. J. K. Morris, Mrs. Elmer Johnson. STANDING - 
J. K. Morris, Elmer Johnson, Chairman. 





LADIES SUNBONNET & DRESS COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Minerva Prowant, Mrs. Barbara Lower, Mrs. Ruth 
Rupp. STANDING- Mrs. Eleanora Champion, Chairman; Mrs. 
Catherine Warner; Mrs. Hattie Brantner. 



RADIO & TELEVISION COMMITTEE 
STANDING- James Jones; Rev. William Johnson, Chairman; James 
Pettinger. 



69 



KAUFMAN'S 

Plumbing & Heating 



Lanark, Illinois 



PLUMBING 
HEATING 



WATER SYSTEMS 
ELECTRICAL 



PHONES 
Home HY 3-2498 — Shop HY 3-2686 



rCtaq^ 



Compliments of 

Your Dependable Store For Quality Merchandise 
FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 



Congratulations Lanark ! 

JOE CLARK 

I am your Jolly Milk Hauler 
in this area. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Your Implement Dealer 

MT. CARROLL 



Congratulations Lanark 

WINSLOW SHOE CO. 

14 West Stephenson Street 
Freeport, Illinois 



CONGRATULATIONS LANARK 

See Me For Your Plumbing Problems 

or 

Installing New Fixtures 

Eddie Wolford 



Lanark 



Illinois 



Limestone & Gravel at all Times 

See Us For Full Details 

Howard Nelson 

Lanark, Illinois 



^ 



^ 



'EVERY SIRE PROVED GREAT' 




AMERICAN 

BREEDERS 

SERVICE 



Inter County 
Breeders 

Earl Listort, owner 
Reliable 
Technicians 
Lanark HY 3-2509 
Shannon VO 4-2450 
Forreston YE 8-2450 
Polo 69132 

Mt. Carroll 4661 



70 





PATRONS TICKET COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Leona Willis, Mrs. Joy Sword, Chairman. STAND- 
ING -Reynold Bloyer, Vincent Olson, Co-chairman. NOT SHOWN - 
Elmer Johnson. 



MUSIC COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Grace Burmeister, Mrs. Ruth Sisler, Chairman. 
STANDING -Francis Engles, Earl Robison. NOT SHOWN -Ruth 
Diffenderfer, Co-chairman. 




THE SHILOH BELLES CHAPTER 
SEATED -Mrs. Cora Dale, Mrs. Merle Heineman, Mrs. Mary Rausch, Mrs. Lois Myers, Mrs. Mabel Hoy, 
Mrs. Lawrence Haught, Mrs. Minnie Champion. STANDING - Mrs. Everett Johns, Mrs. Hazel Forry, Mrs. 
Geraldine Ferry, Mrs. Freda Michael, Mrs. Wm. Rodermel, Mrs. Anna Kimpel, Mrs. Linnie Bornemeier, 
Mrs. Randall Downs, Mrs. Everett Sorensen, Mrs. Roy Rupp, Mrs. Irvin Elliott, Mrs. Edna Schreiner, Mrs. 
Harlan Downs, and Mrs. Esther Hoover. 



71 



Call HY 3-2560 
For All Your Printing Needs 

"Service Is Our Motto 1 ' 

Norman Hoffman— Prop. 

THE ADVERTISER 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 


THE FRIENDLY FRANKLIN LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY IS REPRESENTED AT YOUR 100- 
YEAR BIRTHDAY PARTY. WE ARE HAPPY TO 
BE PART OF SO NICE AN OCCASION. 

FRANKLIN LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

Founded 1884 — Springfield, Illinois 

Victor L. Duray general agent 

8% North Galena Avenue 
Freeport, Illinois 


"Where Smart Women 
Buy Their Clothes" 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

FIELD'S 

Freeport, III. 


Compliments of 

Spencer's 

28 W. Stephenson Freeport, Illinois 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

CARROLL LANES 

Mt. Carroll, Illinois 

Hollis and Clara Meeks 


Sievert's 

PIZZA— The Best in Carroll County 

STEAKS SEA FOOD 

ITALIAN SPAGHETTI 

Greetings To Lanark on TOO Years 

Bob Sievert 

MT. CARROLL, ILLINOIS 


CONGRATULATIONS TO LANARK 

C. H. LITTLE & COMPANY 

Established 1859 

CHINA • GLASSWARE 

House Furnishings — Toys 

Lamps — Silverware 
Gifts — Electric Appliances 

FREEPORT ILLINOIS 


Compliments of 

Brown's Print Shop . . Milledgeville 

Earl Robinson Lanark 

P.L.S. Corner Market Lanark 

H & J Cafe Lanark 

Margie's Beauty Shop .... Lanark 

Lindsey's Tavern Lanark 

Weber's Tavern Shannon 



72 




TRAFFIC & SAFETY COMMITTEE 
SEATED- Larry Christiansen; Leslie Fulrath, Chairman; Irving Merkel; Donald Adams. STANDING - Steve 
Schleuning, Howard Meacham, Robert Aikens, Neil Henry, Leroy Frey, Allan Garner. 





PARADES COMMITTEE 
SEATED - Howard Nelson, Mrs. Ethelyn Rahn, Melvin Folk, Chair- 
man. STANDING - Robert Guenzler, Mrs. Rex Lower, Mrs. Ruth 
Bowers, Kenneth Truman. NOT SHOWN - Mrs. James Lindsay. 



PIONEER EVENT COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Edmo Zuck, Miss Mary Ewing, Mrs. Beth Piesen. 
STANDING - Miss Lorraine Ewing, Mrs. Hazel Mathias, Mrs. Harold 
Eisenbise, Mrs. Besse Bowers. NOT SHOWN -Arthur Guentner, 
Ward Frederick. 



73 



M. H. Gillogly 

GENERAL EXCAVATING 

Phone: HY 3-2570 
Lanark, Illinois 


Compliments of 

MT. CARROLL, ILLINOIS 


"Welcome 
To The Century Of Progress In Lanark" 

Roswell W. Packard 

"Living Insurance — For A Better Living" 

by 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of U.S. 

HY 3-2149 Lanark, III. 


Congratulations to the Lanark Centennial 

Folk Spray and 
Brush Painting 

"Faster & Better Service For Your Money" 

ROSS M. FOLK 

Phone HY 3-6572 Lanark. Illinois 


Congratulations Lanark 

Morton Salt Co. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Carstenson Freight 
Lines, Inc. 

Clinton, Iowa 


Congratulations 
Lanark 

The Clark Co. 

Black Topping 

PHONE 6-2822 POLO, ILL. 


Compliments of 

Hopkin's Road 
Equipment Co. 

Dixon, Illinois 



74 





HISTORICAL BOOK COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Evelyn Kloepping; Mildred Shaner; Annette Isenberger, 
Chairman; Marie Lamoreux. STANDING - Leone Pettinger, John 
Kloepping, Leona Hess, R. Dieter, Emma Sherwood. NOT SHOWN - 
Leona Elmer. Frank WallirW 



COSTUME & MAKE-UP COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Betty Wiebers, Mrs. Margaret Zentner, Mrs. 
Jeannine Carroll, Chairman. STANDING - Mrs. Rose Shepard, Mrs. 
Carolee Zuck, Mrs. Dolores Merchant. NOT SHOWN -Delia Grove, 
Margaret Glenn, Phylis Engleking. 





NOVELTIES COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Mrs. Helen Manning, Mrs. Wallick. STANDING- James E 
Miller, Chairman; R. N. Flickinger; Dale Tisehauser. 



FIREWORKS COMMITTEE 
Robert Shaner, Albert Champion. 



75 



Lanark Farmers, Inc. 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 

• Lumber 

• Coal 

• Building Material 

First in Quality 

Fairest in Price 

Fastest in Service 


Home Cooked Meals 

Sandwiches 

Home Made Pies 

— Open 24 Hours — 

Lanark, Illinois 


Lanark Body & Fender Shop 

24-Hour Wrecker Service 

PHONES: 

Days HY 3-6540 

Nights HY 3-6334 or 3-2594 


MerkePs General Repair 
Marine Shop 

Johnson Outboard Sales and Service 

Open Every Night and Saturdays 

IRVING MERKEL 

on Highway 64 
Lanark, Illinois 


FRANK PARKER 

Grain Dealer 
Custom Shelling — General Trucking 

446 South Broad Phone HY 3-2501 
LANARK, ILLINOIS 


Lotz Motors 

Buick and Ponriac 

Authorized Parts & Service 
HY 3-2350 

Lanark 


Miller Motor Sales 

Ford Sales and Service 

Phone HYacinth 3-2334 — 124 East Carroll St. 

Lanark, Illinois 


Melvin Folk 
& Sons 

LIMESTONE and GRAVEL HAULING 
Phosphate Spreading 

Phone HY 3-2140 • Lanark, Illinois 



76 




OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Carrie Burkholder, Mrs. Truman Royer, Hazel Hoak, Edmo Zuck. STANDING- Ruth Geary, 
Luella Peters, Eva Truman, Marie Flickinger, Mrs. Earl Bear, Cora Hawbecker, Lucile Adams. NOT 
SHOWN - Mrs. Marie Buche. 




PROMENADE & CARAVAN COMMITTEE -INSURANCE COMMITTEE 

PHOTOGRAPHY COMMITTEE - CASHIERS & GATES COMMITTEE 

SEATED- Louella Baxter, Paul Merchant, Helen Johns, Roswell Packard, Claude Stauffer, Francis Prowant. 

STANDING -Perry Baxter, Ross Folk, Shirley Folk, Earl Liston.Bill Cook, George Bergdall, Cora Lindsay, 

Marge Hoak, Conrad Aschenbrenner. 



77 



( standard) 
Don's Standard Station 

Gas — Oil — Batteries 

All Sizes of Tires 

Car Washing and Waxing 

Lanark, Illinois 


LUMBER - BUILDING MATERIALS 
PAINT - FENCING - COAL 


Miller Hatchery 

ELSIE MILLER CRAM 
LANARK, ILLINOIS 

BABY CHICKS # SUPPLIES # FEEDS 


Flickinger's 

Accounting — MFA Insurance 
and Tax Service 

111 North Broad Street 

Lanark, Illinois 

HY 3-2395 


Engels & Lindsay 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 

Clover Farm 

Your Complete Food Market 


Orville Bowers 

Grain Buying & Selling 

Trucking HYocinth 3-2536 

Shelling Lanark, Illinois 


CONGRATULATIONS 

Poffenberger's Tavern 

37 YEARS OF SERVICE 
MT. CARROLL 


Don Blair Produce 

— Cash Buyer Poultry and Eggs — 
Lanark Illinois 



78 




HOSPITALITY CENTER COMMITTEE 
SEATED-Mrs. Nelle Courts, Mrs. HattieWarfel, Alice Ackermann, Mrs. Lake Flicklnger, Mrs. Neil Ather- 
ton. STANDING- Mrs. Archie Heath; Betty Carroll; Mrs. Glenn Wise, Chairman; Mrs. Sidney Bird; Mrs. 
Velma VanBuskirk; Miss Ella Sue Beck; and Mrs. Florence Merchant. NOT SHOWN -Mrs. Harry Lowman, 
Mrs. J. K. Morris. 





BROTHERS OF BRUSH COMMITTEE 
SEATED- James Lindsay, Lawrence Wiebers. STANDING -Randall 
Downs, Frank Parker, Don Shaulis, Chairman. NOT SHOWN -Jack 
Baxter, Henry Meyer 



ADVANCE SALE COMMITTEE 
SEATED -Phylis Engleking, Co-chairman; Agnes Fox; Kathleen 
Mathias. STANDING- Floren Fox, Alice Ackermann, Claire Mathias, 
Mrs. Glenn Wise, Rex Rahn. NOT SHOWN - Evelyn Hodes, Chairman; 
John K. Morris; Joan Kimmel; Betty DeGraff; BobEngleking, Wilma 
Welp, Merrill Bowers, Helen Olsen, Pat Burmeister, Marion Haw- 
becker, E. K. Graham, Betty Merchant, Margarette Zentner, Olive 
Kingsbury, Joe Piesen. 



79 



"office furniture and supplies 
• blank books 
•greeting cards 
"stationery 

The Otto Wagner Store 

Established 1885 

12 West Main St. — Freeport, III. 

Phone ADams 2-6171 


Compliments of 

COLLIER'S MUSIC STORE 

21 E. Stephenson St. ADams 2-5215 
Freeport, Illinois 


Schoen Shoe Repair 

Hose 

Laces 

Polish 

Men's Shoes 

Work & Dress Rubbers 

Lanark, Illinois 


FEED OF CHAMPIONS 

Sturtevant's Elevator 

Grain — Feeds — Seeds — Salt 

Phone HY 3-2369 
LANARK ILLINOIS 


DIEHL'S 
RUFFLE INN 

The House of Fine Foods 

501 N. Main Street 
Savanna, Illinois 


Garrity Rexall Drugs 

Stephenson & State 
Freeport, III. 

"WE GIVE S & H GREEN STAMPS" 


Sunnyside Tavern 

Fern and Bud Aubrey 

BEERS, WINES AND LIQUORS 

MT. CARROLL, ILLINOIS 


Tietz-Lynde Co. 

AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 

701 NORTH SECOND ST. 
ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 



80 





KRAZY KOUNTRY KLUB CHAPTER 
SEATED -Helen Manning, Amanda Bloyer, Helen Miller, Alice Snid- 
er, Minerva Prowant, Earlene Traum. STANDING- Mildred Diehl, 
Gladys Keeney, Maude Lang, Marie Lamoreux, Shirley Prowant. 



PERKY PIONEERS CHAPTER 
SEATED -Mrs. Marge Hoak, Mrs. Erna Garner, Mrs. Ruth Packard, 
Mrs. Archie Heath, and Mrs. Cora Lindsay. STANDING - Mrs. 
Marilyn Christiansen, Mrs. Isabel Shearer, Mrs. Grace Sweitzer, 
Mrs. Lucille Miller, and Mrs. Marian Peat. 





THE WICK TRIMMERS CHAPTER 
SEATED -Mrs. Glenn Blair, Jr., Mrs. Shirley Folk, Mrs. Luella 
Brown, Mrs. Melvin Folk. STANDING- Mrs. Larry Christiansen, 
Mrs. Floyd Stiele and Dorothy Libberton. 



THE LITTLE LAMBS CHAPTER 
SEATED - Melvin Folk, Larry Christiansen, Don Blair. STANDING - 
Glenn Blair, Jr., Ross Folk, Francis Smith, and Richard Libberton. 



A 9 a. 


Ifsl 


I ©i 








Wft 


W4f: f^KM^ 


^ 


U L ^ 






-~ 






PRAIRIE BELLES CHAPTER 
SEATED -Helen Olson, Evelyn Hodes, Pat Burmeister, Mrs. R. 
Dieter. STANDING - Dorothy Sorenson, Margaret Zentner, Barbara 
Roth, Jeanette McFadden, Mrs. John Henze, Mrs. Norman Hoffman 
and Kathleen Mathias. 



CENTENNIAL SQUAWS CHAPTER 
SEATED -Mrs. Emma Sherwood, Mrs. Margaret Engleking, Mrs. 
Hattie Warfel, Mrs. Herb Evans. STANDING - Mrs. Myrtle Baum, 
Mrs. Lake Flickinger, Miss Lorraine Ewing, Mrs. Sidney Bird, 
Mrs. Donald Asay, Mrs. Mable Hoy. 



81 



Albert M. Greison 

"Quality Footwear" 

SERVING YOU FOR OVER 30 YEARS 

Savanna, Illinois 


"WE WRITE IT RIGHT" 

Complete Insurance Protection 

iTAxa6'4, *) \u4wrtutce ?4 y&ttcy 

105 N. Broad St. Phone HY 3-2255 
Lanark, Illinois 


Compliments of 

Michigan Salt Co. 

St. Louis, Michigan 


Hawes Bottling 
Works 

703 W. CLEVELAND ST. 

Phone ADams 2-2912 

FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 


Dixon Garage Supply 
Co., Inc. 

Jobbers of 
Automotive Parts and Equipment 

205 EAST FIRST ST. -:- DIXON, ILLINOIS 

Phone AT 3-1781 


Barker Lumber Co. 

Earl H. Meier, Mgr. 

BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 
FUEL- PAINTS - FENCING 

We Treat You [] The Year • 

Phone VO 4-2141 Shannon, III. 


Haircutting is our Business 

— Let us trim your hair regularly — 

Haircuts including flat tops $1.25 

Open Tuesday thru Friday 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
Saturday 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

City Barber Shop 

STANLEY WAGNER, PROP. 


Newberry Wallpaper & 
Paint Co. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Wallpaper — Paints — Varnishes — Lacquers 

Oils — Glass — Painters' Supplies 

— ARTISTS' MATERIALS — 

We Deliver 22 W. Main St. 
Phone AD 2-6612 Freeport, III. 



82 





SQUARE DANCE GROUP 
j"RONT TO BACK -Mr. & Mrs. Patrick McCue, Mr. & Mrs. Ken- 
leth Geisz, Mr. & Mrs. Earl Liston, Mr. & Mrs. James Carroll. 



SQUARE DANCE GROUP 
FRONT TO BACK -Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Geisz, Mr. & Mrs. Fred 
Swanson, Mr. Marvin Hartman & Diane Flickinger, Frank Wallick & 
Mrs. Ellen Hartman. 












E» tW^ 


i r 'l 


i 








^*^j 


U. 'mmr ^L 


i 


w^k 1H ^1 








S 'J^B 

















SQUARE DANCE GROUP 
FRONT TO BACK- Mr. & Mrs. Wallick, Mr. & Mrs. Richard Kimpel, 
Mr. & Mrs. Ross Folk, Mr. & Mrs. Robert Engleking. 



THE GRANGE CHAPTER 
SEATED -Ralph Roberts, Dean Meador, Francis Prowant, Naaman 
Diehl, Russell Lamoreux, Randall Traum. STANDING - Lawrence 
Haught, Lawrence Meador, Wallace Ware, Clarence Vandervelt, 
Leo Poffenberger, Earl Carbaugh. 



83 



Stakemiller 
Shoe Store 

Men's, Women's, Children's Shoes 
Boys' and Men's Clothes 

Mt. Carroll 



E. G. Shinner & Company, Inc. 

422 Main Street 

SAVANNA, ILLINOIS 

Telephone 4171 



MONUMENTS 

MT. CARROLL GRANITE and MARBLE WORKS 

Geo. W. Ivey & Sons, Proprietors 

Shop Located at Mt. Carroll, Illinois 



All Work Done by Pneumatic Tools and Sand 
Blast. Prices Right. Workmanship Guaranteed. 

Telephone 3034 



HERSCHEL PARTS 
are available to fit 

ALL MAKES of 
mowers and combines 



M»NUF»CTURINC CO , INCORPORATED 




PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



Pitt's Sport Store 

Everything in Sports 



COMPLIMENTS OF: 



Phone 8155 
502 Main St. 
Savanna, III. 



Jaydon Distributors, 
Inc. 



Sundra Spot 
Non-Food Departments 



REGEZ 

CHEESE 

and 

PAPER 

SUPPLY 

COMPANY 



PROFIT SHAftTSg-OTLCO. 




WALT REGEZ 



MONROE, 
WISCONSIN 



SCHNEIDER OIL CO. 

Complete Line of Petroleum Products 
Tank Wagon Service 

Highest in Quality — Lowest in Price 

Phone VO 4-2670 — :- Shannon, Illinois 



84 





POST OFFICE CHAPTER 
SEATED - Francis Kloepping, Ned Dollinger, Carl Christiansen. 
STANDING -Warren Barklow, Albert Champion, William Johns, 
Kenneth Geisz. 



WOMAN'S CLUB CHAPTER 
SEATED - Virginia Sichta, Ruth Geary, Marian Peat. STANDING - 
Hazel Hoak, Mrs. Earl Bear, Mrs. Merle Hawbecker.Besse Bowers. 





1* 


P<V*^«0 8 


i 


K^-^ 




^^^ 




Wl 




THE CACKLE BELLES 
SEATED -Ardith Winters, Betty Wiebers, Phylis Engleking, Doris 
Lindsay, Jeannine Carroll, Harriett Liston. STANDING -Jean Mun- 
son, Margaret Glenn, Catherine Warner, Betty Merchant, Dorothea 
Rahn, Hattie Brantner. 



THE PLOWBOYS CHAPTER 
SEATED- Lawrence Hubbard, Lawrence Derrer, Roger Finifrock. 
STANDING - Harlan Martz, Loren Martz, Ellis Appelgate, and Tom 
Diffenderfer. 



85 



Ruth Parker Beauty Salon 

125 Broad Street - Phone HY 3-2501 
Lanark, Illinois 

Owner and Operator for 25 years 


LANARK FEED MILL 

GEORGE CROFTON 

Lanark, Illinois Phone HY 3-2700 

Grinding — Rolling — Feed — Fertilizer 


FREEPORT AUTEX CO. 

Auto Supplies — Radios — TV — Appliances 

218-220 W. Stephenson Street 
FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 


Shepley Hayner Corp. 

Manufacturers of 
Freeport Water Treatment Equipment 

1301 S. West Ave. Freeport, Illinois 


Schindler's Automotive Service 

Skelly Oil Company 

Mt. Carroll, Illinois 


Compliments of 

Hadley's Cafe Mt. Carroll, III. 

Gamble's Store Shannon, III. 

Lanark Barber Shop .... Lanark, III. 
Parod Dept. Store Lanark, III. 

(Arvid Parod — Prop.) 

Cut & Kurl Beauty Shop .. Shannon 

(Doris Linker — Operator) 


Compliments of 

MESSING & BECKER 

18 South Galena Ave. 
Freeport, Illinois 


Compliments of 

Shannon Locker 

SHANNON ILLINOIS 


Congratulations 
Lanark 

Lang Jewelry 
Company 

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 


Compliments of 

Gochnaur's Ready-To-Wear 

20 West Main Street — :— Freeport, Illinois 

Coats — Suits — Dresses — Millinery 


CONGRATULATIONS LANARK 

ILL 

Fine Women's & Children's Clothing 
FREEPORT. ILLINOIS 


Peat's Service Station 

Complete Line of Mobil Products 

Plus Satisfactory Service 

While in town let us be your 

headquarters for your needs. 

37 Years Serving You At The Same Location 
George W. Peat, Owner 

Lanark, Illinois 


KIMMEL MOBIL STATION 

GAS OIL 
TRACTOR TIRES BATTERIES 

LANARK, ILLINOIS 



86 




SEATED -Mrs. George Jones, Rev. Joe Pieson, Mrs. Randall Downs. STANDING - Rev. Theodore Kimrael, 
Rev. Ray Aspinall. 

PRESS RELEASE COMMITTEE 



87 



PRINTED BY STEPHENSON-CARROLL PUBLISHERS, LENA, ILLINOIS 



IN APPRECIATION 

The Historical Book Committee wishes to express their 
appreciation to those people who have made this book possible. 

To those who so generously shared their memories and 
treasured pictures, to the Lanark Gazette for use of their files, 
to those who lent history books and other printed matter, and to 
those who purchased advertising space, our sincere thanks. 

Without each of these this book could not have been written. 
Our hope is that it may have brought to the minds of some fond 
memories of bygone years and that to others it has pointed to a 
way of life that could well be emulated today. 



Mrs. C. F. Isenberger, Chr. 
Mrs. Hugh Pettinger 
Mrs. Russell Lamoreux 
Miss Leona Hess 
Mrs. Emma Sherwood 
Mrs. John Kloepping 
Mrs. Robert Shaner 
Mr. John Kloepping 
Mr Richard Dieter 
Mrs. Leona Elmer 
Mr. Frank Wallick 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 

977 3345L220 C001 

OUR HERITAGE - A CENTURY OF PROGRESS I 



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